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Introductory Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach – Burdge/Driessen

Download Introductory Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach – Burdge/Driessen written by Julia Burdge in PDF format. This book is under the category Chemistry and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 0073402702; 1259876535/9780073402703/ 9781259876530. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

$19.99

Specifications

book-author

Julia Burdge

publisher

McGraw-Hill Higher Education; 1st edition

file-type

PDF

pages

608 pages

language

English

asin

B01CF6FTMA

isbn10

0073402702; 1259876535

isbn13

9780073402703/ 9781259876530


Book Description

From its very origin; Introductory Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach (PDF) by Julia Burdge and Michelle Driessen has been written and developed using an atoms‐first approach specific to introductory chemistry. It is not a pared-down version of a general chemistry textbook but carefully crafted with the introductory‐chemistry student in mind. The ordering of topics facilitates the conceptual development of chemistry for the novice rather than the historical development that has been used traditionally. Its style and language are student‐friendly and conversational; and the importance and wonder of chemistry in everyday life are emphasized at every opportunity. Continuing in the Burdge tradition; this textbook employs an outstanding art program; a consistent problem-solving approach; interesting applications woven throughout the chapters and a wide variety and range of end-of-chapter problems.

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NOTE: This sale only includes Introductory Chemistry: An Atoms First Approach in PDF. NO access codes are included.

 

book-author

Julia Burdge

publisher

McGraw-Hill Higher Education; 1st edition

file-type

PDF

pages

608 pages

language

English

asin

B01CF6FTMA

isbn10

0073402702; 1259876535

isbn13

9780073402703/ 9781259876530

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover
Title
Copyright
Dedication
About the Authors
Brief Contents
Contents
Acknowledgments
1 ATOMS AND ELEMENTS
1.1 The Study of Chemistry
Why Learn Chemistry?
The Scientific Method
1.2 Atoms First
1.3 Subatomic Particles and the Nuclear Model of the Atom
1.4 Elements and the Periodic Table
Elements in the Human Body
Helium
1.5 Organization of the Periodic Table
Elements in Earth’s Crust
1.6 Isotopes
Mass Spectrometry
Iron-Fortified Cereal
1.7 Atomic Mass
2 ELECTRONS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE
2.1 The Nature of Light
Laser Pointers
2.2 The Bohr Atom
Fireworks
The Photoelectric Effect
Visualizing Chemistry – Bohr Atom
2.3 Atomic Orbitals
s orbitals
p orbitals
d and f orbitals
2.4 Electron Configurations
2.5 Electron Configurations and the Periodic Table
2.6 Periodic Trends
2.7 Ions: The Loss and Gain of Electrons
Electron Configuration of Ions
Lewis Dot Symbols of Ions
3 COMPOUNDS AND CHEMICAL BONDS
3.1 Matter: Classification and Properties
States of Matter
Mixtures
Properties of Matter
3.2 Ionic Bonding and Binary Ionic Compounds
3.3 Naming Ions and Binary Ionic Compounds
Naming Atomic Cations
Naming Atomic Anions
Naming Binary Ionic Compounds
3.4 Covalent Bonding and Molecules
Covalent Bonding
Molecules
Molecular Formulas
Fixed Nitrogen in Fertilizers
3.5 Naming Binary Molecular Compounds
3.6 Covalent Bonding in Ionic Species: Polyatomic Ions
Product Labels
Product Labels
Hydrates
3.7 Acids
3.8 Substances in Review
Properties of Atoms
Distinguishing Elements and Compounds
Determining Whether a Compound Is Ionic or Molecular
Naming Compounds
4 HOW CHEMISTS USE NUMBERS
4.1 Units of Measurement
Base Units
Mass, Length, and Time
Metric Multipliers
Temperature
The Fahrenheit Temperature Scale
4.2 Scientific Notation
Very Large Numbers
Very Small Numbers
Using the Scientific Notation Function on Your Calculator
4.3 Significant Figures
Exact Numbers
Measured Numbers
Arthur Rosenfeld
Calculations with Measured Numbers
4.4 Unit Conversion
Conversion Factors
The Importance of Units
Derived Units
The International Unit
Dimensional Analysis
4.5 Success in Introductory Chemistry Class
5 THE MOLE AND CHEMICAL FORMULAS
5.1 Counting Atoms by Weighing
The Mole (The “Chemist’s Dozen”)
Molar Mass
Interconverting Mass, Moles, and Numbers of Atoms
5.2 Counting Molecules by Weighing
Calculating the Molar Mass of a Compound
Interconverting Mass, Moles, and Numbers of Molecules (or Formula Units)
Combining Multiple Conversions in a Single Calculation
Redefining the Kilogram
5.3 Mass Percent Composition
Iodized Salt
5.4 Using Mass Percent Composition to Determine Empirical Formula
Fertilizer & Mass Percents
5.5 Using Empirical Formula and Molar Mass to Determine Molecular Formula
6 MOLECULAR SHAPE
6.1 Drawing Simple Lewis Structures
Lewis Structures of Simple Molecules
Lewis Structures of Molecules with a Central Atom
Lewis Structures of Simple Polyatomic Ions
6.2 Lewis Structures Continued
Lewis Structures with Less Obvious Skeletal Structures
Lewis Structures with Multiple Bonds
Exceptions to the Octet Rule
Bleaching, Disinfecting, and Decontamination
6.3 Resonance Structures
6.4 Molecular Shape
Flavor, Molecular Shape, and Line Structures
Bond Angles
Molecular Shapes Resulting from Expanded Octets
6.5 Electronegativity and Polarity
Electronegativity
Bond Polarity
Molecular Polarity
How Bond Dipoles Add to Determine Molecular Polarity
6.6 Intermolecular Forces
Dipole-Dipole Forces
Hydrogen Bonding
Dispersion Forces
Linus Pauling
Intermolecular Forces in Review
7 SOLIDS, LIQUIDS, AND PHASE CHANGES
7.1 General Properties of the Condensed Phases
7.2 Types of Solids
Ionic Solids
Molecular Solids
Atomic Solids
Network Solids
A Network Solid as Hard as Diamond
7.3 Physical Properties of Solids
Vapor Pressure
Melting Point
7.4 Physical Properties of Liquids
Viscosity
Surface Tension
Surface Tension and the Shape of Water Drops
Vapor Pressure
Boiling Point
High Altitude and High-Pressure Cooking
7.5 Energy and Physical Changes
Temperature Changes
Solid-Liquid Phase Changes: Melting and Freezing
Liquid-Gas Phase Changes: Vaporization and Condensation
Solid-Gas Phase Changes: Sublimation
8 GASES
8.1 Properties of Gases
Gaseous Substances
Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases
8.2 Pressure
Definition and Units of Pressure
Measurement of Pressure
Fritz Haber
8.3 The Gas Equations
The Ideal Gas Equation
Pressure Exerted by a Column of Fluid
The Combined Gas Equation
The Molar Mass Gas Equation
8.4 The Gas Laws
Boyle’s Law: The Pressure-Volume Relationship
Charles’s Law: The Temperature-Volume Relationship
Automobile Air Bags and Charles’s Law
Avogadro’s Law: The Moles-Volume Relationship
8.5 Gas Mixtures
Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures
Mole Fractions
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
9 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLUTIONS
9.1 General Properties of Solutions
Honey – A Supersaturated Solution
Instant Hot Packs
9.2 Aqueous Solubility
9.3 Solution Concentration
Percent by Mass
Trace Concentrations
Molarity
Molality
Comparison of Concentration Units
9.4 Solution Composition
Robert Cade, M.D.
9.5 Solution Preparation
Preparation of a Solution from a Solid
Preparation of a More Dilute Solution from a Concentrated Solution
Preparing a Solution from a Solid
Serial Dilution
9.6 Colligative Properties
Freezing-Point Depression
Boiling-Point Elevation
Ice Melters
Osmotic Pressure
10 CHEMICAL REACTIONS AND CHEMICAL EQUATIONS
10.1 Recognizing Chemical Reactions
10.2 Representing Chemical Reactions with Chemical Equations
Metals
Nonmetals
Noble Gases
Metalloids
10.3 Balancing Chemical Equations
The Stoichiometry of Metabolism
10.4 Types of Chemical Reactions
Precipitation Reactions
Acid-Base Reactions
Oxygen Generators
Oxidation-Reduction Reactions
Antoine Lavoisier
Dental Pain and Redox
10.5 Chemical Reactions and Energy
10.6 Chemical Reactions in Review
11 USING BALANCED CHEMICAL EQUATIONS
11.1 Mole to Mole Conversions
11.2 Mass to Mass Conversions
11.3 Limitations on Reaction Yield
Limiting Reactant
Percent Yield
Combustion Analysis
Alka-Seltzer
11.4 Aqueous Reactions
11.5 Gases in Chemical Reactions
Predicting the Volume of a Gaseous Product
Calculating the Required Volume of a Gaseous Reactant
Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac
11.6 Chemical Reactions and Heat
12 ACIDS AND BASES
12.1 Properties of Acids and Bases
James Lind
12.2 Definitions of Acids and Bases
Arrhenius Acids and Bases
BrØnsted Acids and Bases
Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs
12.3 Water as an Acid
12.4 Strong Acids and Bases
12.5 pH and pOH Scales
Antacids and the pH Balance in Your Stomach
Lake Natron
12.6 Weak Acids and Bases
12.7 Acid-Base Titrations
12.8 Buffers
13 EQUILIBRIUM
13.1 Reaction Rates
Collision Theory
13.2 Chemical Equilibrium
How Do We Know That the Forward and Reverse Processes Are Ongoing in a System at Equilibrium?
13.3 Equilibrium Constants
Sweet Tea
Calculating Equilibrium Constants
Magnitude of the Equilibrium Constant
13.4 Factors that Affect Equilibrium
Hemoglobin Production at High Altitude
Addition or Removal of a Substance
Changes in Volume
Changes in Temperature
14 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
14.1 Why Carbon Is Different
14.2 Hydrocarbons
Alkanes
Alkenes and Alkynes
Reactions of Hydrocarbons
14.3 Isomers
Partially Hydrogenated Vegetable Oils
Representing Organic Molecules with Bond-Line Structures
14.4 Functional Groups
14.5 Alcohols and Ethers
14.6 Aldehydes and Ketones
14.7 Carboxylic Acids and Esters
14.8 Amines and Amides
14.9 Polymers
15 BIOCHEMISTRY
15.1 Biologically Important Molecules
Glycerol
Fatty Acids
Amino Acids
Sugars
Phosphates
Organic Bases
15.2 Lipids
Fats
Phospholipids
Steroids
15.3 Proteins
Primary Structure
Secondary Structure
Tertiary Structure
Quaternary Structure
15.4 Carbohydrates
Monosaccharides
Disaccharides
Polysaccharides
15.5 Nucleic Acids
16 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY
16.1 Radioactive Decay
16.2 Detection of Radiation and Its Biological Effects
Radioactivity in Tobacco
16.3 Dating Using Radioactive Decay
16.4 Medical Applications of Radioactivity
How Nuclear Chemistry Is Used to Treat Cancer
16.5 Nuclear Fission and Nuclear Fusion
Nuclear Fission and Fusion
17 ELECTROCHEMISTRY
17.1 Balancing Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Using the Half-Reaction Method
17.2 Batteries
Construction of a Galvanic Cell
Dry Cells and Alkaline Batteries
Lead Storage Batteries
Lithium-Ion Batteries
Fuel Cells
17.3 Corrosion
17.4 Electrolysis
Electrolysis of Molten Sodium Chloride
Electrolysis of Water
Appendix: Mathematical Operations
Glossary
Answers to Odd-Numbered Problems
Index

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