Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction

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Download Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction written by Won-Kee Hong in PDF format. This book is under the category Engineering and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 81027214/9780081027219. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Specifications

book-author

Won-Kee Hong

publisher

Woodhead Publishing

file-type

PDF

pages

493 pages

language

English

asin

B082D9TV38

isbn10

81027214

isbn13

9780081027219


Book Description

Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction; (PDF) emphases the design and construction of novel composite precast frame systems that allow almost effortless erection and structural efficiency. The precast frame systems discussed in the ebook are similar to that of steel frames; but propose similar savings to concrete frames. The design of connections and thorough analysis of their structural behavior is discussed in detail. Basics with regards to the post-yield behavior of metal and concrete are also presented to show how these two different materials are combined together to remove individual material drawbacks.

Readers are given a broad introduction to current technologies that are then combined with a description of the construction methods the author proposes. This ebook will help the end-users become acquainted with the existing types of structural forms; not only the “Lego” type frame system that the author offers.

  • Offers information on structural testing that verifies the accuracy of the structural design
  • Includes several design examples using non-linear finite element analysis completed with Abaqus based-software
  • Includes new milestone inventions in construction that provide structural engineering solutions using an innovative; modularized hybrid frame system
  • Discusses how customary construction methods can be replaced by innovative hybrid composite precast frame systems that offer rapid and effortless erection capabilities and structural efficiency

NOTE: The product only includes the ebook; Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction in PDF. No access codes are included.

 

Additional information

book-author

Won-Kee Hong

publisher

Woodhead Publishing

file-type

PDF

pages

493 pages

language

English

asin

B082D9TV38

isbn10

81027214

isbn13

9780081027219

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Front Cover
Hybrid Composite Precast Systems: Numerical Investigation to Construction
Copyright
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1: Conventional precast assembly
1.1. Review of conventional precast concrete structures
1.1.1. Why precast concrete?
1.1.2. Quality control and facile installation
1.2. Conventional precast connection
1.2.1. Column-to-column connection
1.2.1.1. Cast-in-place connections for column-to-column joint with pour forms
1.2.1.2. Precast assembly using grouted splice sleeve connectors
1.2.1.3. Joints using shim bearing, dowel pin, welding
1.2.1.4. Stacked connections
1.2.1.5. Bolted column connections for fast and safe erection
1.2.1.6. Colum-to-foundation joints using sleeve
1.2.2. Beam-to-column connection
1.2.2.1. Concrete cast at beam-to-column joint; moment connection
1.2.2.2. Beam seated on corbels or steel inserts (haunches); pinned connections
1.2.2.3. Beam-to-column connections via hardware
1.3. Suggestion for the improvement of the precast joints
1.3.1. Use of the cast-in-place concrete
1.3.1.1. Construction waste and concrete pour forms at joints
1.3.1.2. Weakness of the precast connections
1.3.2. Why steel-concrete hybrid composite precast frames? Use of steel-concrete hybrid precast frames with reduced frame …
References
Chapter 2: Experimental investigation of the precast concrete and the precast steel-concrete hybrid composite frames havi …
2.1. Conventional bolted endplates used for steel frames
2.2. Description of the mechanical joints
2.2.1. Joint connection from an erection point of view
2.2.2. Column-to-column joint for the moment connections
2.2.2.1. Mechanical joints with the bolted metal plates for the precast columns
2.2.2.2. Mechanical joints with interlocking couplers for precast columns
2.2.3. Beam-to-column joint for the moment connections
2.3. Design of the mechanical joints
2.3.1. Column-to-column connection
2.3.1.1. Design of the column plates
2.3.1.2. Nominal bearing strength of the plates at the bolt holes
2.3.1.3. Design of the bolts
2.3.1.4. Design of the tension in bolts
2.3.1.5. Design of pretension in bolts
2.3.2. Beam-to-column connection and the design of the stiffness of the column plates and bolts
2.4. Verification of the structural performance of the joint via the numerical investigation
2.5. Experimental investigation of the structural performance of the column-to-column connections
2.5.1. Steel-concrete composite columns
2.5.1.1. Description of the tested specimen and test set-up
Metal filler
Concrete filler
2.5.1.2. Instrumentation of the test specimens
2.5.1.3. Test results and review with the design recommendations
Specimen C1
Specimens C2 and C6
Specimen C3
Specimen C4
Specimen C5
2.5.1.4. Strains evolution and the rate of strain increase
Load-displacement relationship
Influence of the metal and concrete plates on the rate of the strain increase of rebars
Influence of the metal and concrete plates on the rate of the strain increase of steel sections
Influence of the metal and concrete plates on the rate of the strain increase of concrete
Strength of the metal and concrete plates
2.5.2. Concrete columns without steel sections
2.5.2.1. Design of the test specimens; derivation of the equations based on strain compatibility
Design of the plates subjected to tensile forces
2.5.2.2. Fabrication of the test specimens
2.5.2.3. Test results
Specimen HC1
Specimen HC2
Specimen HC3
2.5.3. Conclusions of the column-to-column connections
2.6. Experimental investigation of the structural performance of the beam-to-column connections
2.6.1. Steel-concrete hybrid composite beams
2.6.1.1. Description of the tested specimen and test set-up
2.6.1.2. Instrumentation of the test specimens
2.6.1.3. Test results and review with the design recommendations
Specimen B1
Specimen B2
Specimen B3
Specimen B4
Specimen B5
Specimen B6
2.6.2. Conclusions of the beam-to-column connections
2.7. Test assembly
2.7.1. Significance of the connection
2.7.2. Assembly of the full-scale precast columns
2.7.3. Test assembly: Precast column splice implementing the mechanical joints having laminated metal plates
2.7.4. Test assembly
References
Chapter 3: The investigation of the structural performance of the hybrid composite precast frames with mechanical joints …
3.1. Numerical investigation of the structural performance
3.1.1. Nonlinear inelastic finite element analysis
3.1.1.1. Plastic potential and yield surface
3.1.1.2. Plasticity model of damaged concrete; concrete crack models in the finite element analysis
3.1.1.3. Damaged plasticity model for concrete
Uniaxial tension and compression stress behavior
Damaged plasticity model for concrete (concrete damaged plasticity)
3.1.2. FEA parameters and their physical meanings
3.1.2.1. Material parameters for calibrations
3.1.2.2. Yield surface of concrete
3.1.3. Dilation angle
3.1.3.1. Volumetric dilatations
3.1.3.2. Definition of dilation angle
3.1.3.3. Drucker-Prager hyperbolic plastic potential function
Flow (plasticization) rule based on nonassociated plastic flow potential
Eccentricity,
Identification of dilation angles and damage variables for concrete section confined by T section steels
3.1.3.4. Viscosity parameter
3.1.3.5. Application of artificial damping factors to resolve the stability problems
Damping factor to solve numerical instability
Damping with steel structures
3.1.4. Fracture criterion
3.1.4.1. Pressure-independent yield criteria; von Mises and Tresca
3.1.4.2. Pressure-dependent yield criteria; Drucker-Prager and Mohr-Coulomb
3.1.5. Penetration of contact element
3.1.5.1. Definition of contact
3.1.5.2. Enforcement of contact compatibility to minimize penetrations
3.1.5.3. Linear and nonlinear penalty stiffness
3.1.5.4. Contact formulation
3.1.6. Modeling technique; types of contact elements in FEA
3.1.6.1. Embedded, tie elements and a geometric tolerance
3.1.6.2. Accurate contact model for steel-concrete hybrid composite members; bond-slip characteristics between concrete a …
3.1.6.3. Limitation of the study for bond stress-slip characteristics of steel-concrete hybrid frames
3.2. Nonlinear finite element analysis of hybrid composite precast columns spliced by a mechanical metal plate
3.2.1. Finite element models for the mechanical joints with laminated plates
3.2.1.1. Mechanical joints with metal filler plates
Details of the tested specimens
Modeling of contact elements; definition of slave and master surfaces in a contact pair
Modeling of rebars and steels in steel-concrete hybrid composite members; embedded, tie (cohesive) model
Bond-slip method
Calibration of numerical data
Structural performance of Specimen C2
Structural performance of Specimen C5
Structural performance of Specimen C6 (monolithic specimen)
Plate deformation and strains
Conclusions
Nonlinear FEA model
Seismic performance of the precast concrete frames with mechanical joints having metal plates
3.2.1.2. Mechanical joints with concrete filler plates
FE models for mechanical connections using metal and concrete plates
Structural performance of Specimen C3
Influence of the thickness of concrete filler plates on the structural performance of Specimens C3 and C4
Calibration details
Influence of metal and concrete plates on the rate of strain increase of rebars
Influence of metal and concrete plates on the rate of strain increase of steel sections
Influence of metal and concrete plates on the rate of strain increase of concrete
Design recommendations
Conclusions
3.2.2. Numerical investigation of metal plates with high-yield strength steel splicing precast concrete columns
3.2.2.1. Description and calibration of the nonlinear finite element parameters
Numerical modeling of Specimen HC3 having monolithic joint
Numerical modeling of Specimens HC1 and HC2 having mechanical joints
3.2.2.2. Parameters defined for Specimens HC1, HC2, and HC3 having mechanical joint
3.2.2.3. Influence of high-yield metal plates on the flexural capacity
Influence of the high-yield strength of metal plates on the flexural strength of Specimen HC1 having mechanical joints
The height of column plates to avoid concrete degradation
3.2.2.4. The influence of headed studs on the flexural strength of the connection
3.2.2.5. Activation of strains of structural components attached to column plate
3.2.2.6. Conclusion
3.3. Nonlinear finite element analysis of the beam-to-column connections with mechanical metal plates for concrete/steel- …
3.3.1. Finite element models for fully and partially restrained moment connections
3.3.1.1. With metal filler plates
Description of the numerical details
Nonlinear stress-strain relationship of unconfined and confined concrete; modeling techniques
Concrete damaged plasticity model
Modeling of contact elements
Mesh discretization, mesh density, mesh compatibility, and element distortion
Mesh discretization
Mesh density
Assigning material properties
Results and discussion
Monolithic specimen (B6)
Specimen B2; reflecting low cycle fatigue effect by reducing strain hardening behavior
Specimen B5; partially restrain moment connection
Contribution of the metal plates to the flexural capacity of the beams
Conclusions
3.3.1.2. With concrete filler plates
Numerical modeling
Mathematical model
Modeling of contact elements
Damaged plasticity model for concrete
Influence of the stiffness of metal and concrete plates on the structural performance
Load-displacement relationship
Influence of the stiffness of metal and concrete plates on the rates of the strain increase of concrete
Influence of the stiffness of metal and concrete plates on the rates of the strain increase of rebar
Influence of the stiffness of metal and concrete plates on the rate of strain increase of the steel sections
Strength of extended endplate and concrete filler plates
Influence of the stiffness of the metal plates on the load paths validated by numerical and experimental microscopic strains
Strain evolution of the structural elements of the hybrid joints
Influence of metal plate on strain-stress relationships of structural components
Fracture mode of concrete filler plate
Conclusions
References
Chapter 4: L-type hybrid precast frames with mechanical joints using laminated metal plates
4.1. Experimental investigation of the L-type hybrid precast frames using mechanical joints with laminated metal plates
4.1.1. Why L-type precast frames?
4.1.2. Specimen details and test preparation of Specimens LC1-LC3
4.1.3. Preparation of the test
4.1.4. Experimental investigations
4.1.4.1. Structural behavior and associated failure modes for Specimen LC3 (monolithic specimen)
4.1.4.2. Structural behavior and associated failure modes for Specimen LC1
4.1.4.3. Structural behavior and associated failure modes for Specimen LC2
4.1.4.4. Comparisons of the structural performance of the three specimens (LC1, LC2, and LC3)
4.1.4.5. Activation of the structural elements contributing to the flexural capacity of the hybrid precast column-column …
4.1.5. Conclusion
4.2. Nonlinear finite element analyses of the L-type columns with mechanical joints
4.2.1. Selection of the elements and discretization
4.2.2. Defining interactions; surface-to-surface contact
4.2.3. Definition of the host, embedded elements, and constraints
4.2.4. FE models with a foundation; load application at a test center
4.2.5. Structural behavior of laminated metal plates
4.2.6. FE models without foundations
4.2.6.1. Load applied at a test center, not a shear center
4.2.6.2. Load applied at shear center
4.2.7. Strain evolution of L-type columns (monolithic and mechanical joints with no axial force) with/without foundation
4.2.8. Conclusions
4.3. Design verification of the beam-column frames
4.3.1. Nonlinear numerical model
4.3.1.1. Description of the numerical model
4.3.1.2. Modeling column-girder joints
4.3.1.3. Modeling the surface element
4.3.2. Design verification
4.3.2.1. Dynamic analysis of high-rise buildings with multibay L-type composite precast frames
4.3.2.2. Determination of the nominal strength at a concrete strain of 0.003 based on the concrete mesh under the average …
4.3.2.3. Strain evolutions of the mechanical joints
4.3.2.4. Strain evolution of the structural components attached to plates
4.3.3. Conclusion
4.4. Test erection
4.4.1. Erection of irregular L-shaped frames
4.4.1.1. Significance of the test erection
4.4.1.2. Column-to-column connection
Connection mechanism
Erection test for column-to-column assembly
4.4.1.3. Girder-to-column connections
Connection mechanism
Erection test for column-to-beam assembly
Verification of the erection test
4.4.2. Conclusion
References
Chapter 5: Novel erection of the precast frames using interlocking mechanical couplers
5.1. Significance of the precast erection using interlocking mechanical joints
5.2. Assembly of the full-scale precast frame by interlocking couplers
5.2.1. Column-to-column connections
5.2.1.1. Using interlocking one-touch interlocking couplers to splice precast columns
5.2.1.2. Test erection
5.2.1.3. Replacing couplers
5.2.2. Girder-to-column connections and the test erection
5.3. Numerical investigation
5.3.1. Description of the mechanical connections for design verification
5.3.2. Finite element model of the proposed joint
5.3.3. Verification of the numerical analysis
5.3.4. Flexural capacity of the connection
5.3.5. Conclusions
References
Chapter 6: Novel precast frame for facile construction of low-rise buildings using mechanically assembled joint to replac …
6.1. Introduction
6.1.1. Advantages and challenges
6.1.2. Methodology of joint details for low-rise frames; connections for column-to-column, column-to-girder, and girder-t …
6.2. Design of the building with the mechanical joints
6.2.1. Design load combination and conventional design detail
6.2.2. Design of mechanically layered plates based on nonlinear finite element analysis
6.2.3. Numerical model and nonlinear finite element analysis parameters
6.2.3.1. Defining contact properties
6.2.3.2. Modeling of embedded elements (reinforcing bars and H-steels)
6.2.3.3. Discretization
6.2.4. Design of connection plates
6.2.5. Implementation of the extended endplates in girder-to-beam
6.2.5.1. Design of mechanical connections
6.2.5.2. Design of headed studs
6.2.6. Implementation of the extended endplates in column-to-girder connections
6.3. Design verification
6.3.1. Rates of strain increase and strain activation of the structural components at connection
6.3.2. Construction quantities
6.3.3. Reduction of construction period by mechanical connection
6.3.4. Reduction of energy consumption and CO2 emissions with the new precast frame
6.4. Results and conclusions
References
Chapter 7: Novel pipe rack frames with rigid joints
7.1. Overview of the pipe rack frames introduced in this chapter
7.1.1. The innovated pipe rack frames
7.1.2. Overall historical development, advantages and challenges of existing pipe rack frames
7.1.3. Significance of the pipe rack frames with rigid joints; motivations and objectives
7.2. Novel pipe rack frames with rigid joints
7.2.1. Precast concrete-based pipe rack frames with rigid monolithic beam-column connections
7.2.2. Precast concrete-based pipe rack frames with rigid mechanical joints
7.2.2.1. Frame module for easy assembly by the use of mechanical joints
7.2.2.2. Assembly sequence
7.2.2.3. Numerical investigation
7.2.3. Pipe-racks with prestressed frames
7.2.4. Rigid steel frames
7.3. Case study
7.3.1. Steel-concrete hybrid composite precast frames with moment connections
7.3.2. Dynamic characteristics
7.3.3. Suggestion for rapid construction based on the fast track using the proposed frames
7.3.4. Structural savings
7.3.5. Offsite modular construction with base template
7.4. Conclusions
References
Chapter 8: Application to the modular construction
8.1. Overview of the modular construction for low-rise buildings
8.2. Conventional modular construction
8.2.1. Structural and connection systems
8.2.2. Cellular-type modules and intra-module connection (Fig. 8.2.1) [3]
8.2.3. Inter-module connection [1]
8.2.4. Application of the modular construction to high-rise buildings
8.3. Implementation of the mechanical joints in precast connections for modular construction
8.3.1. High-rise building application
8.3.2. Application to special structures
8.4. Lateral stability of the hybrid composite precast frames with rigid mechanical joints
8.4.1. Seismic responses and fundamental period of the modular building
8.4.2. Modular steel building with braced frames
8.4.3. Precast concrete-based frames having mechanical joints
8.5. Conclusions
References
Chapter 9: Precast steel-concrete hybrid composite structural frames with monolithic joints
9.1. Why the precast steel-concrete hybrid composite with monolithic joints?
9.2. Structural behavior of the hybrid composite beams with monolithic joints
9.2.1. Wide steel flanges encased in concrete; the interaction between steel and concrete
9.2.1.1. Experimental investigation; flexural strength of the composite beam
9.2.1.2. Flexural moment capacity at the deflection of 1/360
9.2.1.3. Load bearing strength of the precast wings against construction loads
9.2.2. T-shaped steel section encased in concrete
9.2.2.1. Experimental investigation of the composite precast beams with T-shaped steel sections
9.2.2.2. Instrumentation and the test set-up
9.2.2.3. Numerical investigation
3D mesh for finite element analysis
Parameters for the nonlinear numerical model
9.2.2.4. Test results
9.2.2.5. Structural behavior of the unsymmetrical precast composite beams
9.2.2.6. Load-strain relationship using strain compatibility based method
9.2.2.7. Sensitivity of the dilation angles and damage variable to the nonlinear numerical behavior of the composite beams
9.2.2.8. Viscosity
9.2.2.9. Influence of the steel section on the activation of the rebars and concrete in compression for the damage assessment
9.2.2.10. Prediction of the propagation for the tensile cracks and compressive crushing; an evaluation of damage evolution
9.2.3. Seismic capacity of the hybrid precast beams
9.2.3.1. Strong column-weak beam frame
9.2.3.2. Story drift angle qualified as a special moment frame
9.2.4. Prestressed precast beam monolithically integrated with columns
9.2.5. Discussions and conclusions
9.2.5.1. Composite precast beam with T section steel
9.3. Analytical prediction of the nonlinear structural behavior of the steel-concrete hybrid composite structures
9.3.1. Conventional strain compatibility approach
9.3.2. Steel-concrete hybrid composite beams without axial loads
9.3.2.1. Analytical models of the concrete confined by transverse rebars and wide-flange steel sections based on an itera …
9.3.2.2. Prediction of the nonlinear structural behavior of the steel-concrete composite beams
Equivalent confining factors
Idealization of the concrete confined by the structural steel sections
Influence of the buckling of the longitudinal bars and the structural steel
9.3.2.3. Formulation of the equilibrium at the yield and maximum load limit states based on an iterated strain compatibility
At the yield limit state
At the maximum load limit state
9.3.2.4. Verification analysis
Verification model
Nonlinear finite element analysis based on the concrete plasticity
Verification of the analytical model with the finite element analysis results
Influence of the buckling effect of the reinforcing steels on the flexural strength
Verification of the algorithm
Reduced beam depth using the composite beams
9.4. Assembly of the steel beam-column joints with a skewed beam section
9.4.1. Conventional steel erection
9.4.2. New erection method; splicing plates and bolting beyond critical path
9.4.2.1. Noncritical installation of the splicing plates and bolting
9.4.2.2. Preinstallation of the L-shaped pocket
9.4.2.3. Numerical evaluation of the proposed connections
9.4.2.4. Conclusions
9.4.3. Precast column spliced by the rebars extended in holes
9.5. Application of the hybrid composite precast frames with the beam depth reduction capability to high-rise buildings
9.5.1. Application to a 19-story building
9.5.1.1. Original design
9.5.1.2. Reduction in floor height
9.5.1.3. Design of the composite frames
9.5.1.4. Design summary
9.5.2. Erection and assembly of the hybrid composite beams
9.5.3. Descriptions of the selected buildings
9.6. Contributions
References
Chapter 10: Artificial-intelligence-based design of the ductile precast concrete beams
10.1. Concept and structure of the artificial neural networks
10.1.1. Analogy with the biological neuron model
10.1.2. ANNs for structural engineering
10.2. Multilayer perception
10.2.1. Weights and bias
10.2.2. Backpropagation by adjusting weights
10.2.3. Activation functions related to the structural-engineering applications
10.2.4. Initialization
10.2.5. Data normalization
10.2.6. Three ways to train ANNs in Matlab
10.2.6.1. Using neural-network toolbox fitting application
10.2.6.2. Using neural-network toolbox data manager
10.2.6.3. Writing Matlab code
10.3. Artificial neural network-based design of the ductile precast concrete beams
10.3.1. Generation of the big structural data; a ductile design of the doubly reinforced precast concrete beams
10.3.2. Supervised training
10.3.2.1. Numbers of datasets, hidden layers, neurons, and training functions
10.3.2.2. Factors influencing neural training
10.3.2.3. Training results and numbers of data values versus hidden layers
10.3.3. Test networks and the design results
10.3.4. Conclusions
References
Index
Back Cover

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