Moral Psychology with Nietzsche

$19.99

Download Moral Psychology with Nietzsche written by Brian Leiter in PDF format. This book is under the category Psychology and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 199696500/9780199696505. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Specifications

book-author

Brian Leiter

publisher

OUP Oxford

file-type

PDF

pages

224 pages

language

English

asin

B07QD6V99B

isbn10

199696500

isbn13

9780199696505


Book Description

In Moral Psychology with Nietzsche (PDF); Brian Leiter defends a set of radical ideas from Nietzsche: there is no objectively true morality; no one is ever morally responsible; there is no free will; and our conscious thoughts and reasoning play almost no major role in our actions and how our lives unfold. Leiter offers a new interpretation of main themes of Nietzsche’s moral psychology; including his anti-realism about the value (including epistemic value); his account of moral judgment and its association to the emotions; his skepticism about free will and moral responsibility; his conception of the will and agency; his epiphenomenalism about particular kinds of conscious mental states; and his views about the heritability of psychological traits. In combining exegesis with the argument; Leiter connects the views of philosophers like Harry Frankfurt; Gary Watson and T. M. Scanlon; and psychologists including Daniel Wegner; Stanley Milgram and Benjamin Libet. Nietzsche emerges not simply as a museum piece from the history of ideas; but as a psychologist and philosopher who exceeds David Hume for insight into human nature and the human mind; anticipates later developments in empirical psychology again and again; and continues to provide sophisticated and unsettling challenges to much conventional wisdom in both psychology and philosophy.

NOTE: The product only includes the ebook; Moral Psychology with Nietzsche in PDF. Access codes are not included.

 

Additional information

book-author

Brian Leiter

publisher

OUP Oxford

file-type

PDF

pages

224 pages

language

English

asin

B07QD6V99B

isbn10

199696500

isbn13

9780199696505

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover……Page 1
Moral Psychology with Nietzsche……Page 4
Copyright……Page 5
Dedication……Page 6
Preface and Acknowledgments……Page 8
Contents……Page 12
1. Moral Psychology, Philosophy, Naturalism……Page 14
2. Misunderstanding Nietzsche’s Naturalism……Page 18
3. How Could Nietzsche Be a Successful Philosophical Naturalist?……Page 22
4. Nietzsche’s Naturalistic Moral Psychology: An Overview……Page 24
PART I: Metaphysics and Epistemology of Value……Page 28
1. Introduction……Page 30
2. Nietzsche’s Metaphysical Anti-Realism about Value……Page 32
3. Explanatory Arguments for Anti-Realism I: The Basic Argument……Page 35
4. Explanatory Arguments for Value Anti-Realism II: The Explanation of Disagreement……Page 42
5. Nietzsche on Disagreement……Page 48
6. Objections to the Explanatory Arguments for Value Anti-Realism……Page 51
7. Has the Argument Proved Too Much?……Page 58
1. The Problem of the Revaluation……Page 62
2. The Privilege Readings: Realism……Page 63
2.1 The Millian Model……Page 65
2.2 The textual pedigree of the Millian Model argument……Page 73
3. Nietzsche as P-Non-Realist……Page 75
3: Moralities are a Sign-Language of the Affects……Page 80
1. Sign-Languages and Symptoms……Page 81
2. Feelings and Affects……Page 83
3. Drives……Page 87
4. Is it True That Moralities Are Just a Sign-Language of the Affects?……Page 92
1. Introduction: The Scope of Value Anti-Realism……Page 97
2. Nietzsche on Perspectivism, Knowledge, and Affects……Page 98
2.1 Gay Science 354……Page 100
2.2 On the Genealogy of Morality III:12……Page 102
2.3 Janaway on perspectivism……Page 105
2.4 Perspectivism in Thucydides……Page 109
3. Defending Nietzsche’s Naturalism about Value……Page 112
3.1 Naturalism is self-refuting……Page 113
3.2 Naturalism imposes domain-specific standards where they do not belong……Page 116
3.3 The naturalist has not explained “real” normativity……Page 120
PART II: Freedom, Agency, and the Will……Page 126
1. Introduction: Free Will, Moral Responsibility, Determinism……Page 128
2. What Nietzsche Says about Free Wil and Moral Responsibility……Page 130
3. Fatalism……Page 133
4. The Phenomenology of Willing……Page 138
5. What We Experience as Willing is not Causally Efficacious……Page 142
6. Confusing Cause and Effect……Page 145
6.1 Skepticism about the causal efficacy of consciousness……Page 148
6.2 The error of free will……Page 152
7. The Real Genesis of Action……Page 154
8. Against Compatibilism……Page 157
1. “The Sovereign Individual”……Page 160
2. Coherence and Freedom: A Consideration of Other Passages……Page 164
3. Nietzsche, Spinoza, Fate, and Freedom……Page 170
4. Conclusion……Page 173
1. Introduction……Page 175
2.1 Aristotle……Page 176
2.2 Kant……Page 178
3. The Empirical Evidence in Moral Psychology……Page 179
3.1 Type-facts and heredity (for Nietzsche)……Page 180
3.2 Type-facts and fatalism (for Nietzsche)……Page 182
3.3 The role of upbringing (against Aristotle)……Page 184
3.4 Conscious decision and behavior (against Kant)……Page 187
4. A Puzzle aboutMoral Diversity on the Nietzschean View of Moral Psychology……Page 191
5. Conclusion……Page 193
Other References……Page 194
Index……Page 206

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