Chemical Principles (6th Edition)

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Download Chemical Principles (6th Edition) written by Peter Atkins, Loretta Jones, Leroy Laverman in PDF format. This book is under the category Chemistry and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 1429288973; 1464124663/9781429288972/ 9781464124662. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Specifications

book-author

Peter Atkins, Loretta Jones, Leroy Laverman

publisher

W.H. Freeman; 6th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1120 pages

language

English

isbn10

1429288973; 1464124663

isbn13

9781429288972/ 9781464124662


Book Description

Written for calculus-inclusive general chemistry courses; Chemical Principles; 6th edition (PDF) helps college students develop chemical insight by showing the connections between fundamental chemical ideas and their applications. Unlike other textbooks; it begins with a detailed picture of the atom then builds toward chemistry’s frontier; continually demonstrating how to solve problems; think about matter and nature; and visualize chemical concepts as real working chemists do.

Chemical Principles; The Quest for Insight; 6th edition; show that Flexibility in level is very crucial; and is largely established through clear labeling (separating in boxes) the calculus coverage in the textbook: Instructors/Teachers have the option of whether to incorporate calculus in the coverage of topics.

The multimedia integration of Chemical Principles 6e is more deeply established than any other textbook for this course. Through the unique eBook; the comprehensive ChemPortal; Living Graph icons that connect the textbook to the Web; and a complete set of animations; chemistry students can take full advantage of the wealth of resources available to them to help them learn and gain a deeper understanding.

NOTE: This sale only contains the ebook Chemical Principles; 6th edition; in PDF. No access codes or other material is included.

Additional information

book-author

Peter Atkins, Loretta Jones, Leroy Laverman

publisher

W.H. Freeman; 6th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1120 pages

language

English

isbn10

1429288973; 1464124663

isbn13

9781429288972/ 9781464124662

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Front Cover
Title Page
Copyright Page
Contents in Brief
CONTENTS (with direct page links)
Letter from the Authors (to Instructors)
Preface
FUNDAMENTALS
Introduction and Orientation
Chemistry and Society
Chemistry: A Science at Three Levels
How Science Is Done
The Branches of Chemistry
Mastering Chemistry
A Matter and Energy
A.1 Physical Properties
A.2 Force
A.3 Energy
Exercises
B Elements and Atoms
B.1 Atoms
B.2 The Nuclear Model
B.3 Isotopes
B.4 The Organization of the Elements
Exercises
C Compounds
C.1 What Are Compounds?
C.2 Molecules and Molecular Compounds
C.3 Ions and Ionic Compounds
Exercises
D The Nomenclature of Compounds
D.1 Names of Cations
D.2 Names of Anions
D.3 Names of Ionic Compounds
TOOLBOX D.1 • How to Name Ionic Compound
D.4 Names of Inorganic Molecular Compounds
TOOLBOX D.2 • How to Name Simple Inorganic Molecular Compounds
D.5 Names of Some Common Organic Compounds
Exercises
E Moles and Molar Masses
E.1 The Mole
E.2 Molar Mass
Exercises
F Determination of Chemical Formulas
F.1 Mass Percentage Composition
F.2 Determining Empirical Formulas
F.3 Determining Molecular Formulas
Exercises
G Mixtures and Solutions
G.1 Classifying Mixtures
G.2 Separation Techniques
G.3 Concentration
G.4 Dilution
TOOLBOX G.1 • How to Calculate the Volume of Stock Solution Required for a Given Dilution
Exercises
H Chemical Equations
H.1 Symbolizing Chemical Reactions
H.2 Balancing Chemical Equations
Exercises
I Aqueous Solutions and Precipitation
I.1 Electrolytes
I.2 Precipitation Reactions
I.3 Ionic and Net Ionic Equations
I.4 Putting Precipitation to Work
Exercises
J Acids and Bases
J.1 Acids and Bases in Aqueous Solution
J.2 Strong and Weak Acids and Bases
J.3 Neutralization
Exercises
K Redox Reactions
K.1 Oxidation and Reduction
K.2 Oxidation Numbers: Keeping Track of Electrons
TOOLBOX K.1 • How to Assign Oxidation Numbers
K.3 Oxidizing and Reducing Agents
K.4 Balancing Simple Redox Equations
Exercises
L Reaction Stoichiometry
L.1 Mole-to-Mole Predictions
L.2 Mass-to-Mass Predictions
TOOLBOX L.1 • How to Carry Out Mass-to-Mass Calculations
L.3 Volumetric Analysis
TOOLBOX L.2 • How to Interpret a Titration
Exercises
M Limiting Reactants
M.1 Reaction Yield
M.2 The Limits of Reaction
TOOLBOX M.1 • How to Identify the Limiting Reactant
M.3 Combustion Analysis
Exercises
Chapter 1 THE QUANTUM WORLD
Investigating Atoms
1.1 The Nuclear Model of the Atom
1.2 The Characteristics of Electromagnetic Radiation
1.3 Atomic Spectra
Quantum Theory
1.4 Radiation, Quanta, and Photons
1.5 The Wave–Particle Duality of Matter
1.6 The Uncertainty Principle
1.7 Wavefunctions and Energy Levels
BOX 1.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Nanocrystals and Fluorescence Microscopy
Exercises
Chapter 2 QUANTUM MECHANICS IN ACTION: ATOMS
The Hydrogen Atom
2.1 The Principal Quantum Number
2.2 Atomic Orbitals
2.3 Electron Spin
BOX 2.1 • How Do We Know . . . That an Electron Has Spin?
2.4 The Electronic Structure of Hydrogen
Many-Electron Atoms
2.5 Orbital Energies
2.6 The Building-Up Principle
TOOLBOX 2.1 • How to Predict the Ground-State Electron Configuration of an Atom
2.7 Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table
The Periodicity of Atomic Properties
2.8 Atomic Radius
2.9 Ionic Radius
2.10 Ionization Energy
2.11 Electron Affinity
2.12 The Inert-Pair Effect
2.13 Diagonal Relationships
2.14 The General Properties of the Elements
Exercises
Chapter 3 CHEMICAL BONDS
Ionic Bonds
3.1 The Ions That Elements Form
3.2 Lewis Symbols
3.3 The Energetics of Ionic Bond Formation
3.4 Interactions Between Ions
Covalent Bonds
3.5 Lewis Structures
3.6 Lewis Structures of Polyatomic Species
TOOLBOX 3.1 • How to Write the Lewis Structure of a Polyatomic Species
3.7 Resonance
3.8 Formal Charge
TOOLBOX 3.2 • How to Use Formal Charge to Determine the most Likely Lewis Structure
Exceptions to the Octet Rule
3.9 Radicals and Biradicals
BOX 3.1 • What Has This To Do With . . . Staying Alive? Chemical Self-Preservation
3.10 Expanded Valence Shells
3.11 The Unusual Structures of Some Group 13 Compounds
Ionic versus Covalent Bonds
3.12 Correcting the Covalent Model: Electronegativity
3.13 Correcting the Ionic Model: Polarizability
The Strengths and Lengths of Covalent Bonds
3.14 Bond Strengths
3.15 Variation in Bond Strength
3.16 Bond Lengths
BOX 3.2 • How Do We Know . . . The Length of a Chemical Bond?
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 1 • Infrared Spectroscopy
Exercises
Chapter 4 MOLECULAR SHAPE AND STRUCTURE
BOX 4.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Drugs By Design and Discovery
The VSEPR Model
4.1 The Basic VSEPR Model
4.2 Molecules with Lone Pairs on the Central Atom
TOOLBOX 4.1 • How to Use the Vsepr Model
4.3 Polar Molecules
Valence-Bond Theory
4.4 Sigma and Pi Bonds
4.5 Electron Promotion and the Hybridization of Orbitals
4.6 Other Common Types of Hybridization
4.7 Characteristics of Multiple Bonds
Molecular Orbital Theory
BOX 4.2 • How Do We Know . . . That Electrons are Not Paired?
4.8 The Limitations of Lewis’s Theory
4.9 Molecular Orbitals
4.10 Electron Configurations of Diatomic Molecules
BOX 4.3 • How Do We Know . . . The Energies of Molecular Orbitals
Toolbox 4.2 • How to Determine the Electron Configuration and Bond Order of a Homonuclear Diatomic Species
4.11 Bonding in Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecules
4.12 Orbitals in Polyatomic Molecules
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 2 • Ultraviolet and Visible Spectroscopy
Exercises
Chapter 5 THE PROPERTIES OF GASES
The Nature of Gases
5.1 Observing Gases
5.2 Pressure
5.3 Alternative Units of Pressure
The Gas Laws
5.4 The Experimental Observations
5.5 Applications of the Ideal Gas Law
TOOLBOX 5.1 • How to Use the Ideal Gas Law
5.6 Gas Density
5.7 The Stoichiometry of Reacting Gases
5.8 Mixtures of Gases
Molecular Motion
5.9 Diffusion and Effusion
5.10 The Kinetic Model of Gases
5.11 The Maxwell Distribution of Speeds
BOX 5.1 • How Do We Know . . . The Distribution of Molecular Speeds?
Real Gases
5.12 Deviations from Ideality
5.13 The Liquefaction of Gases
5.14 Equations of State of Real Gases
Exercises
Chapter 6 LIQUIDS AND SOLIDS
Intermolecular Forces
6.1 The Origin of Intermolecular Forces
6.2 Ion–Dipole Forces
6.3 Dipole–Dipole Forces
6.4 London Forces
6.5 Hydrogen Bonding
6.6 Repulsions
Liquid Structure
6.7 Order in Liquids
6.8 Viscosity and Surface Tension
Solid Structures
6.9 Classification of Solids
BOX 6.1 • How Do We Know . . . What a Surface Looks Like?
6.10 Molecular Solids
6.11 Network Solids
6.12 Metallic Solids
6.13 Unit Cells
6.14 Ionic Structures
The Impact on Materials
6.15 Liquid Crystals
6.16 Ionic Liquids
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 3 • X-Ray Diffraction
Exercises
Chapter 7 INORGANIC MATERIALS
Metallic Materials
7.1 The Properties of Metals
7.2 Alloys
7.3 Steel
7.4 Nonferrous Alloys
Hard Materials
7.5 Diamond and Graphite
7.6 Calcium Carbonate
7.7 Silicates
7.8 Cement and Concrete
7.9 Borides, Carbides, and Nitrides
7.10 Glasses
7.11 Ceramics
Materials for New Technologies
7.12 Bonding in the Solid State
7.13 Semiconductors
7.14 Superconductors
7.15 Luminescent Materials
7.16 Magnetic Materials
7.17 Composite Materials
Nanomaterials
7.18 The Nature and Uses of Nanomaterials
7.19 Nanotubes
7.20 Preparation of Nanomaterials
Exercises
Chapter 8 THERMODYNAMICS: THE FIRST LAW
Systems, States, and Energy
8.1 Systems
8.2 Work and Energy
8.3 Expansion Work
8.4 Heat
8.5 The Measurement of Heat
8.6 The First Law
8.7 A Molecular Interlude: The Origin of Internal Energy
Enthalpy
8.8 Heat Transfers at Constant Pressure
8.9 Heat Capacities at Constant Volume and Constant Pressure
8.10 A Molecular Interlude: The Origin of the Heat Capacities of Gases
8.11 The Enthalpy of Physical Change
8.12 Heating Curves
BOX 8.1 • How Do We Know . . . The Shape of a Heating Curve?
The Enthalpy of Chemical Change
8.13 Reaction Enthalpies
8.14 The Relation Between ΔH and ΔU
8.15 Standard Reaction Enthalpies
8.16 Combining Reaction Enthalpies: Hess’s Law
TOOLBOX 8.1 • How to Use Hess’s Law
8.17 Standard Enthalpies of Formation
8.18 The Born–Haber Cycle
8.19 Bond Enthalpies
8.20 The Variation of Reaction Enthalpy with Temperature
BOX 8.2 • What Has This To Do With . . . The Environment? Alternative Fuels
The Impact on Technology
8.21 The Heat Output of Reactions
Exercises
Chapter 9 THERMODYNAMICS: THE SECOND AND THIRD LAWS
Entropy
9.1 Spontaneous Change
9.2 Entropy and Disorder
9.3 Changes in Entropy
9.4 Entropy Changes Accompanying Changes in Physical State
9.5 A Molecular Interpretation of Entropy
9.6 The Equivalence of Statistical and Thermodynamic Entropies
9.7 Standard Molar Entropies
BOX 9.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: The Quest for Absolute Zero
9.8 Standard Reaction Entropies
Global Changes in Entropy
9.9 The Surroundings
9.10 The Overall Change in Entropy
9.11 Equilibrium
Gibbs Free Energy
9.12 Focusing on the System
9.13 Gibbs Free Energy of Reaction
9.14 The Gibbs Free Energy and Nonexpansion Work
9.15 The Effect of Temperature
Impact on Biology
9.16 Gibbs Free Energy Changes in Biological Systems
Exercises
Chapter 10 PHYSICAL EQUILIBRIA
Phases and Phase Transitions
10.1 Vapor Pressure
10.2 Volatility and Intermolecular Forces
10.3 The Variation of Vapor Pressure with Temperature
10.4 Boiling
10.5 Freezing and Melting
10.6 Phase Diagrams
10.7 Critical Properties
Solubility
10.8 The Limits of Solubility
10.9 The Like-Dissolves-Like Rule
10.10 Pressure and Gas Solubility: Henry’s Law
10.11 Temperature and Solubility
10.12 The Enthalpy of Solution
10.13 The Gibbs Free Energy of Solution
Colligative Properties
10.14 Molality
TOOLBOX 10.1 • How to Use the Molality
10.15 Vapor-Pressure Lowering
10.16 Boiling-Point Elevation and Freezing-Point Depression
10.17 Osmosis
TOOLBOX 10.2 • How to Use Colligative Properties to Determine Molar Mass
Binary Liquid Mixtures
10.18 The Vapor Pressure of a Binary Liquid Mixture
10.19 Distillation
10.20 Azeotropes
The Impact on Biology and Materials
10.21 Colloids
10.22 Bio-Based and Biomimetic Materials
BOX 10.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Drug Delivery
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 4 • Chromatography
Exercises
Chapter 11 CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIA
Reactions at Equilibrium
11.1 The Reversibility of Reactions
11.2 Equilibrium and the Law of Mass Action
11.3 The Thermodynamic Origin of Equilibrium Constants
11.4 The Extent of Reaction
11.5 The Direction of Reaction
Equilibrium Calculations
11.6 The Equilibrium Constant in Terms of Molar Concentrations of Gases
11.7 Alternative Forms of the Equilibrium Constant
11.8 Using Equilibrium Constants
TOOLBOX 11.1 • How to Set Up and Use an Equilibrium Table
The Response of Equilibria to Changes in Conditions
11.9 Adding and Removing Reagents
11.10 Compressing a Reaction Mixture
11.11 Temperature and Equilibrium
Impact on Materials and Biology
11.12 Catalysts and Haber’s Achievement
11.13 Homeostasis
Exercises
Chapter 12 ACIDS AND BASES
The Nature of Acids and Bases
12.1 Brønsted–Lowry Acids and Bases
12.2 Lewis Acids and Bases
12.3 Acidic, Basic, and Amphoteric Oxides
12.4 Proton Exchange Between Water Molecules
12.5 The pH Scale
12.6 The pOH of Solutions
Weak Acids and Bases
12.7 Acidity and Basicity Constants
12.8 The Conjugate Seesaw
12.9 Molecular Structure and Acid Strength
12.10 The Strengths of Oxoacids and Carboxylic Acids
The pH of Solutions of Weak Acids and Bases
12.11 Solutions of Weak Acids
TOOLBOX 12.1 • How to Calculate the pH of a Solution of a Weak Acid
12.12 Solutions of Weak Bases
TOOLBOX 12.2 • How to Calculate the pH of a Solution of a Weak Base
12.13 The pH of Salt Solutions
Polyprotic Acids and Bases
12.14 The pH of a Polyprotic Acid Solution
12.15 Solutions of Salts of Polyprotic Acids
12.16 The Concentrations of Solute Species
TOOLBOX 12.3 • How to Calculate the Concentrations of all Species in a Polyprotic Acid Solution
12.17 Composition and pH
BOX 12.1 • What Has This To Do With . . .The Environment? Acid Rain and the Gene Pool
Autoprotolysis and pH
12.18 Very Dilute Solutions of Strong Acids and Bases
12.19 Very Dilute Solutions of Weak Acids
Exercises
Chapter 13 AQUEOUS EQUILIBRIA
Mixed Solutions and Buffers
13.1 Buffer Action
13.2 Designing a Buffer
13.3 Buffer Capacity
BOX 13.1 • What Has This To Do With . . . Staying Alive? Physiological Buffers
Titrations
13.4 Strong Acid–Strong Base Titrations
TOOLBOX 13.1 • How to Calculate the pH During a Strong Acid–Strong Base Titration
13.5 Strong Acid–Weak Base and Weak Acid–Strong Base Titrations
TOOLBOX 13.2 • How to Calculate the pH During a Titration of a Weak Acid or a Weak Base
13.6 Acid–Base Indicators
13.7 Stoichiometry of Polyprotic Acid Titrations
Solubility Equilibria
13.8 The Solubility Product
13.9 The Common-Ion Effect
13.10 Predicting Precipitation
13.11 Selective Precipitation
13.12 Dissolving Precipitates
13.13 Complex Ion Formation
13.14 Qualitative Analysis
Exercises
Chapter 14 ELECTROCHEMISTRY
Representing Redox Reactions
14.1 Half-Reactions
14.2 Balancing Redox Equations
TOOLBOX 14.1 • How to Balance Complicated Redox Equations
Galvanic Cells
14.3 The Structure of Galvanic Cells
14.4 Cell Potential and Reaction Gibbs Free Energy
14.5 The Notation for Cells
TOOLBOX 14.2 • How to Write a Cell Reaction Corresponding to a Cell Diagram
14.6 Standard Potentials
14.7 The Electrochemical Series
14.8 Standard Potentials and Equilibrium Constants
TOOLBOX 14.3 • How to Calculate Equilibrium Constants from Electrochemical Data
14.9 The Nernst Equation
14.10 Ion-Selective Electrodes
Electrolytic Cells
14.11 Electrolysis
14.12 The Products of Electrolys
TOOLBOX 14.4 • How to Predict the Result of Electrolysis
The Impact on Materials
14.13 Applications of Electrolysis
14.14 Corrosion
14.15 Practical Cells
BOX 14.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Fuel Cells
Exercises
Chapter 15 CHEMICAL KINETICS
Reaction Rates
15.1 Concentration and Reaction Rate
BOX 15.1 • How Do We Know . . . What Happens to Atoms During a Reaction?
15.2 The Instantaneous Rate of Reaction
15.3 Rate Laws and Reaction Order
Concentration and Time
15.4 First-Order Integrated Rate Laws
15.5 Half-Lives for First-Order Reactions
15.6 Second-Order Integrated Rate Laws
Reaction Mechanisms
15.7 Elementary Reactions
15.8 The Rate Laws of Elementary Reactions
15.9 Chain Reactions
15.10 Rates and Equilibrium
Models of Reactions
15.11 The Effect of Temperature
15.12 Collision Theory
BOX 15.2 • How Do We Know . . . What Happens During a Molecular Collision?
15.13 Transition State Theory
Impact on Materials and Biology: Accelerating Reactions
15.14 Catalysis
BOX 15.3 • What Has This To Do With . . . The Environment? Protecting the Ozone Layer
15.15 Industrial Catalysts
15.16 Living Catalysts: Enzymes
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 5 • Computation
Chapter 16 THE ELEMENTS: THE MAIN-GROUP ELEMENTS
Periodic Trends
16.1 Atomic Properties
16.2 Bonding Trends
Hydrogen
16.3 The Element
16.4 Compounds of Hydrogen
BOX 16.1 • What Has This To Do With . . .The Environment? The Greenhouse Effect
Group 1: The Alkali Metals
16.5 The Group 1 Elements
16.6 Compounds of Lithium, Sodium, and Potassium
Group 2: The Alkaline Earth Metals
16.7 The Group 2 Elements
16.8 Compounds of Beryllium, Magnesium, and Calcium
Group 13: The Boron Family
16.9 The Group 13 Elements
16.10 Group 13 Oxides and Halides
16.11 Boranes and Borohydrides
Group 14: The Carbon Family
16.12 The Group 14 Elements
BOX 16.2 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Self-Assembling Materials
16.13 Oxides of Carbon and Silicon
16.14 Other Important Group 14 Compounds
Group 15: The Nitrogen Family
16.15 The Group 15 Elements
16.16 Compounds with Hydrogen and the Halogens
16.17 Nitrogen Oxides and Oxoacids
16.18 Phosphorus Oxides and Oxoacids
Group 16: The Oxygen Family
16.19 The Group 16 Elements
16.20 Compounds with Hydrogen
16.21 Sulfur Oxides and Oxoacids
Group 17: The Halogens
16.22 The Group 17 Elements
16.23 Compounds of the Halogens
Group 18: The Noble Gases
16.24 The Group 18 Elements
16.25 Compounds of the Noble Gases
Exercises
Chapter 17 THE ELEMENTS: THE d-BLOCK
The d-Block Elements and Their Compounds
17.1 Trends in Physical Properties
17.2 Trends in Chemical Properties
Selected Elements: A Survey
17.3 Scandium Through Nickel
17.4 Groups 11 and 12
Coordination Compounds
17.5 Coordination Complexes
BOX 17.1 • What Has This To Do With . . . Staying Alive? Why We Need to Eat d-Metals
TOOLBOX 17.1 • How to Name d-Metal Complexes and Coordination Compounds
17.6 The Shapes of Complexes
17.7 Isomers
BOX 17.2 • How Do We Know . . . That a Complex is Optically Active?
The Electronic Structures of Complexes
17.8 Crystal Field Theory
17.9 The Spectrochemical Series
17.10 The Colors of Complexes
17.11 Magnetic Properties of Complexes
17.12 Ligand Field Theory
Exercises
Chapter 18 NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY
Nuclear Decay
18.1 The Evidence for Spontaneous Nuclear Decay
18.2 Nuclear Reactions
18.3 The Pattern of Nuclear Stability
18.4 Predicting the Type of Nuclear Decay
18.5 Nucleosynthesis
BOX 18.1 • What Has This To Do With . . . Staying Alive? Nuclear Medicine
Nuclear Radiation
18.6 The Biological Effects of Radiation
18.7 Measuring the Rate of Nuclear Decay
BOX 18.2 • How Do We Know . . . How Radioactive a Material Is?
18.8 Uses of Radioisotopes
Nuclear Energy
18.9 Mass–Energy Conversion
18.10 Nuclear Fission
18.11 Nuclear Fusion
18.12 The Chemistry of Nuclear Power
Exercises
Chapter 19 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I: THE HYDROCARBONS
Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
19.1 Types of Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
TOOLBOX 19.1 • How to Name Aliphatic Hydrocarbons
19.2 Isomers
19.3 Properties of Alkanes
19.4 Alkane Substitution Reactions
19.5 Properties of Alkenes
19.6 Electrophilic Addition
Aromatic Compounds
19.7 Nomenclature of Arenes
19.8 Electrophilic Substitution
Impact on Technology: Fuels
19.9 Gasoline
19.10 Coal
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 6 • Mass Spectrometry
Exercises
Chapter 20 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II: POLYMERS AND BIOLOGICAL COMPOUNDS
Common Functional Groups
20.1 Haloalkanes
20.2 Alcohols
20.3 Ethers
20.4 Phenols
20.5 Aldehydes and Ketones
20.6 Carboxylic Acids
20.7 Esters
20.8 Amines, Amino Acids, and Amides
TOOLBOX 20.1 • How to Name Simple Compounds with Functional Groups
Impact on Technology
20.9 Addition Polymerization
20.10 Condensation Polymerization
20.11 Copolymers
20.12 Physical Properties of Polymers
Impact on Biology
20.13 Proteins
BOX 20.1 • Frontiers of Chemistry: Conducting Polymers
20.14 Carbohydrates
20.15 Nucleic Acids
Exercises
MAJOR TECHNIQUE 7 • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Exercises
APPENDIX 1: Symbols, Units,
and Mathematical Techniques
1A Symbols
1B Units and Unit Conversions
1C Scientific Notation
1D Exponents and Logarithms
1E Equations and Graphs
1F Calculus
APPENDIX 2: Experimental Data
2A Thermodynamics Data at 25 °C
2B Standard Potentials at 25 °C
2C Ground-State Electron Confi gurations
2D The Elements
2E Industrial Chemical Production of Selected Organic and Inorganic Commodities
APPENDIX 3: Nomenclature
3A The Nomenclature of Polyatomic Ions
3B Common Names of Chemicals
3C Traditional Names of Some Common Cations with Variable Charge Numbers
GLOSSARY
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J-K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W-X-Y-Z
ANSWERS
Self-Tests B
Fundamentals
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Major Technique 3
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Major Technique 4
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Odd-Numbered Exercises
Fundamentals
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Major Techniques
Illustration Credits
INDEX
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H-I
J-K
L-M
N
O-P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W-X-Y-Z
Periodic Table of the Elements
Frequently Used Tables and Figures
Key Equations
The Elements
SI Prefixes
Fundamental Constants
Relations Between Units

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