The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems

$19.99

Download The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems written by George J. Dimitrakopoulos, Lorna Uden, Iraklis Varlamis in PDF format. This book is under the category Communication and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 128182814/9780128182819. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

SKU: 5b4130c9e891 Category: Tag:

Specifications

book-author

George J. Dimitrakopoulos, Lorna Uden, Iraklis Varlamis

publisher

Elsevier

file-type

PDF

pages

243 pages

language

English

asin

B084ZKBBSD

isbn10

128182814

isbn13

9780128182819


Book Description

The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems (PDF) considers ITS from three perspectives: business models; users; and policy/regulation. Topics cover in-vehicle applications; such as autonomous driving; vehicle-to-vehicle/vehicle-to-infrastructure communication; and related applications; such as personalized mobility. The ebook also examines ITS technology enablers; such as wireless communication; sensing technologies; user behavior as part of the transportation chain; computational technology; regulations; policies; and standards affecting ITS; financial models that influence ITS; and the future of ITS applications. Users will find a holistic approach to the most recent technological advances and the future spectrum of mobility.

  • Integrates coverage of personalized mobility and digital assistants; big data analytics and autonomous driving
  • Systematically presents the whole spectrum of next-generation Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) technologies
  • Includes end-of-chapter; open-ended questions that trigger thinking on the technological; managerial and regulatory aspects of ITS

NOTE: This only includes the ebook The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems in PDF. No access codes included.

Additional information

book-author

George J. Dimitrakopoulos, Lorna Uden, Iraklis Varlamis

publisher

Elsevier

file-type

PDF

pages

243 pages

language

English

asin

B084ZKBBSD

isbn10

128182814

isbn13

9780128182819

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover
TitleThe Future of Intelligent
Transport Systems
Copyright
Introduction
Part I: ITs Technology enablers
Chapter 1 – Sensing and perception systems for ITS
1.1 – Introduction: highly automated vehicles and the importance of perception
1.2 – Driver’s sensor configurations and sensor fusion
1.3 – Small, affordable, and robust LIDAR sensors will enable highly automated vehicles
1.4 – RADAR
1.5 – Fail-operational E/E architectures
References
Chapter 2 – Communication advances
2.1 – Why vehicular communications?
2.2 – Types (modes) of vehicular communications
2.3 – Cellular V2X (C-V2X) and the case of 5G
2.4 – Wireless access for vehicular environments (WAVE) and its migration toward IEEE 802.11p
2.4.1 Safety-related applications
2.4.2 Traffic-management applications
2.4.3 User-comfort and infotainment applications
2.5 – IEEE 1609 family of standards
2.6 – SAE J2735
2.7 – LED-enabled visible light communications (IEEE TG 802.15.7)
2.8 – Bluetooth
2.9 – ETSI and CEN standards for V2X communications
2.10 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 3 – Computing technologies: platforms, processors, and controllers
3.1 – Introduction to modern automotive high-performance computing platforms
3.2 – Consequences for vehicular electrical/electronic (E/E) architectures
3.3 – Solution approaches for automotive eHPC platform
3.3.1 – Overview
3.3.2 – RISC-V extensions for real-time computing
3.3.3 – Monitoring and throttling capabilities of real-time flows
3.3.4 – Automotive eHPC software environment
3.3.5 – Vehicle software requirements
References
Part II: ITs users
Chapter 4 – User requirements and preferences for ITS
4.1 – Requirements engineering
4.2 – Requirements elicitation
4.3 – Requirement elicitation techniques
4.3.1 – Traditional techniques
4.3.2 – Collaborative techniques
4.3.3 – Contextual techniques
4.3.4 – Cognitive techniques
4.4 – Problems in ITS requirements elicitation
4.5 – Potential solutions for ITS requirements elicitation
4.6 – Contextual, social, and dynamic requirements elicitation
4.7 – Activity theory
4.7.1 – Brief review of activity theory
4.7.2 – Benefits of activity theory for ITS requirements elicitations
Questions
References
Chapter 5 – Co-creation of value for user experiences
5.1 – Design for users
5.1.1 – Empathy
5.1.2 – Experience
5.2 – User experience (UX)
5.2.1 – The difference between UX and UI design
5.3 – User experience design (UXD or UED)
5.3.1 – The quadrant model
5.3.2 – User experience design process
5.3.3 – The why, what and how of UX design
5.4 – Co-creation of value
5.5 – Design ITS user experience model
5.5.1 – Products connected with purpose
5.5.2 – A holistic and collaborative approach should be taken
5.5.3 – Identify all stakeholders involved
5.5.4 – Define user value propositions
5.5.5 – Understanding user requirements
5.5.6 – Understand user mental model
5.5.6.1 – User Personas
5.5.7 – Develop conceptual model
5.5.8 – Cocreation of value
Questions
References
Chapter 6 – ITS and their users: classification and behavior
6.1 – Introduction and classifications
6.2 – Impact of the development of ITS on driver behavior
6.3 – Impact of the development of ITS to travelers and road users
6.4 – Impact of the development of ITS on transportation professionals
6.5 – Impact of the development of ITS on local residents and businesses
6.6 – Impact of the development of ITS on vulnerable road users (VRUs)
6.7 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 7 – User acceptance and ethics of ITS
7.1 – Overview of user acceptance of highly automated vehicles
7.2 – Technology acceptance and related models
7.3 – Ethical issues related to highly automated vehicles
References
Part III: ITs business models
Chapter 8 – ITS and economic growth: investment, stakeholders, and relations
8.1 – Introductory definitions related to economic growth
8.2 – Investments in ITS
8.3 – ITS investments planning
8.4 – Stakeholders, relations, and strategies
8.5 – Barriers
8.6 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 9 – Impact of ITS advances on the industry
9.1 – Introduction
9.2 – Increasing levels of human-centered automation in ITS will drive the worldwide economy
9.3 – Evolution of safety and reliability requirements with increasing automation
9.4 – ITS key targets to strengthen European and worldwide industry and its competitiveness
9.5 – Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for cognitive, human-centered ITS
9.6 – Generating user acceptance by functional-safe algorithms and methodologies for ITS
9.7 – Impact on growth and sustainability by compliance for intelligent transport decision systems, Standards
9.8 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 10 – ITS business and revenue models
10.1 – Business model is important
10.2 – Business model definition
10.3 – Components of a business model
10.4 – Types of business models
10.5 – Business model canvas
10.6 – Revenue model
10.6.1 – Business model versus revenue model versus revenue stream
10.7 – Types of revenue models
Markup
Commission
Rent/lease
Advertising
Licensing
Interest
Subscription
Donation
Arbitrage
Fee-for-service
10.8 – Why we need a business model?
10.9 – Value creation
10.10 – Cocreation
10.11 – Value cocreation business models
Questions
References
Chapter 11 – ITS and marketing
Abstract
Keywords
11.1 – Overview
11.2 – Exploiting ITS solutions
11.3 – Marketing ITS solutions in the automotive market
11.3.1 Market potential—OEM point of view
11.3.2 Market potential—supplier point of view
11.3.3 Market potential—technology/engineering/tool providers point of view
11.4 – Marketing strategies for ITS solution providers
11.4.1 – Overview and phases
11.4.1.1 – Initial phase
11.4.1.2 – Inception phase
11.4.1.3 – Implementation phase
11.4.1.4 – Monitoring and improvement phase
11.5 Conclusions
References
Chapter 12 – The societal impact of ITS
12.1 Introduction
12.2 – Smart mobility
12.2.1 – Overview
12.2.2 – Enhancements in traffic safety
12.2.3 – Accessibility and capacity of traffic
12.2.4 – Comfort and enabling of user’s freedom
12.2.5 – Sustainability, energy efficiency, and environment
12.2.6 – Social inclusion and mobility for all
12.3 – Employment
12.3.1 – Educational impact and IP valorization in the EU
12.3.2 – Impact on employment
12.4 – Conclusions
References
Part IV: ITs regulations, policies and standards
Chapter 13 – ITS and sustainability
13.1 – Sustainability
13.1.1 – Why sustainability is important
13.1.2 – The pillars of sustainability
13.1.2.1 – The environmental pillar
13.1.2.2 – The social pillar
13.1.2.3 – The economic pillar
13.2 – Sustainable transportation
13.2.1 – Sustainable transport
13.2.2 – Why sustainable transport is important
13.3 – Intelligent transport systems (ITS)
13.3.1 – Implementing sustainable ITS
13.3.2 – Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans
13.4 – Why we need to have sustainable ITS
13.5 – Sustainable development goals for ITS
Questions
References
Chapter 14 – ITS standardization bodies and standards
14.1 – World-level standardization bodies
14.2 – Continental or national standardization bodies
14.3 – An overview of ITS-related standards
14.4 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 15 – ITS programs and strategies worldwide
15.1 – International strategies for ITS
15.2 – ITS programs
15.3 – Socio and technoeconomic aspects of ITS
References
Part V: The future of ITs applications
Chapter 16 – Transportation network applications
16.1 – Introduction
16.2 – Network management systems
16.2.1 – Driving-assistance systems
Collision avoidance applications
Information mediation
Traffic efficiency applications
16.2.2 – Network operation applications
16.2.2.1 – Product transport and logistics
16.2.2.2 – Network traffic and safety management
16.2.2.3 – Smart urban transportation systems
16.2.2.4 – More transportation-related applications
16.2.3 – The future of transportation network applications
References
Chapter 17 – Autonomous driving levels and enablers
17.1 – Autonomous driving levels
17.2 – Technology enablers
17.2.1 – Beyond technology enablers
17.3 – Research areas
References
Chapter 18 – Intelligent transport systems and smart mobility
18.1 – Introduction
18.2 – Sustainable smart mobility
18.3 – The future of smart mobility and the open challenges
References
Chapter 19 – Big data analytics for intelligent transportation systems
19.1 – Introduction
19.2 – Data collection
19.2.1 – In road networks
19.2.2 – Within smartcities
19.2.3 – In maritime networks
19.2.4 – In air transportation networks
19.3 – Big data analytics
19.3.1 – Smart cities and road networks
19.3.2 – Smart cities and crowd analytics
19.3.3 – Maritime network analytics
19.3.4 – Aircraft analytics
19.4 – Big data processing systems for intelligent transportation
References
Chapter 20 – Personalized mobility services and AI
20.1 – Artificial intelligence in transportation
20.2 – Smart mobility services
20.3 – Conclusions and open issues
References
Chapter 21 – Integrated mobility for smart cities
21.1 – Introduction
21.2 – Smart mobility applications
21.3 – Benefits and challenges
21.4 – The future of Integrated Mobility
21.4.1 – The new features
21.4.2 – Use cases
21.4.3 – The effects
21.5 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 22 – Intelligent transportation systems and blockchain technology
22.1 – Blockchain technology basics and applications
22.2 – Ethereum blockchain and smart contracts
22.3 – An ITS-oriented blockchain model
22.4 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 23 – Conclusions and way forward
23.1 – The future of ITS
23.2 – The upcoming trends
Index
Back Cover

Recent Posts

5 tips for a good business blog

Follow my blog with BloglovinAre you also looking for a good structure for your business blogs? That you finally have a serious and good structure for all your texts that are online? On your website but also on social media. In this review you will find 5 tips from Susanna Florie from her…

Study tips from a budding engineer

“Why engineering?” is a question I get often. The answer for me is simple: I like to solve problems. Engineering is a popular field for many reasons. Perhaps this is because almost everything around us is created by engineers in one way or another, and there are always new, emerging and exciting technologies impacting…

How do I study mathematics and pass my exam?

Not sure how best to study math ? Are you perhaps someone who starts studying the day before the exam? Then you know yourself that your situation is not the most ideal. Unfortunately, there is no magic bullet to make you a maths crack or pass your exam in no time . It is important to know that mathematics always builds on…

(0)
×