Engineering Mathematics (5th Edition)

Download Engineering Mathematics (5th Edition) written by Anthony Croft, Robert Davison, Martin Hargreaves, James Flint in PDF format. This book is under the category Engineering and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 1292146656/9781292146652. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

$19.99

SKU: 194cf6c2de8e Category: Tag:

Specifications

book-author

Anthony Croft, Robert Davison, Martin Hargreaves, James Flint

publisher

Pearson Education; 5th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1024 pages

language

English

isbn10

1292146656

isbn13

9781292146652


Book Description

Engineering Mathematics 5th edition is the unparalleled undergraduate etextbook for students of electronic; electrical; communications and systems engineering. Tried and tested over many years; this widely used etextbook is now in its 5th edition; having been fully updated and revised. This new edition includes an even greater emphasis on the application of mathematics within a range of engineering contexts. It features detailed explanation of why a technique is important to engineers. In addition; it provides essential guidance in how to use mathematics to solve engineering problems. This approach ensures a deep and practical understanding of the role of mathematics in modern engineering.

Engineering mathematics fifth edition is further divided into two special sub-heads namely engineering statistics and engineering optimization. The PDF ebook studies; analyses and uphold the pillars of engineering mathematics and its utmost significance in modern times. The various sub-fields of the subject along with technological progress that have future implications are glanced at in it. For someone with an interest and eye for detail; this etextbook covers the most significant topics in the field of engineering mathematics. The methods and techniques used in the industry and engineering field are engineering mathematics or technomath. It is a branch of applied mathematics and it includes complex analysis; approximation theory; linear algebra; and Fourier analysis; etc.

Revised edition of: Engineering mathematics: a foundation for electronic; electrical; communications; and systems engineers / Anthony Croft; Robert Davison; Martin Hargreaves. 3rd editon. 2001.

About the Author

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover……Page 1
Title Page……Page 4
Copyright Page……Page 5
Dedication……Page 6
Contents……Page 8
Preface……Page 18
Acknowledgements……Page 20
1.1 Introduction……Page 22
1.2 Laws of indices……Page 23
1.3 Number bases……Page 32
1.4 Polynomial equations……Page 41
1.5 Algebraic fractions……Page 47
1.6 Solution of inequalities……Page 54
1.7 Partial fractions……Page 60
1.8 Summation notation……Page 67
Review exercises 1……Page 71
2.1 Introduction……Page 75
2.2 Numbers and intervals……Page 76
2.3 Basic concepts of functions……Page 77
2.4 Review of some common engineering functions and techniques……Page 91
Review exercises 2……Page 134
3.1 Introduction……Page 136
3.3 The trigonometric ratios……Page 137
3.4 The sine, cosine and tangent functions……Page 141
3.5 The sinc x function……Page 144
3.6 Trigonometric identities……Page 146
3.7 Modelling waves using sin t and cos t……Page 152
3.8 Trigonometric equations……Page 165
Review exercises 3……Page 171
4.2 Cartesian coordinate system – two dimensions……Page 175
4.3 Cartesian coordinate system – three dimensions……Page 178
4.4 Polar coordinates……Page 180
4.5 Some simple polar curves……Page 184
4.6 Cylindrical polar coordinates……Page 187
4.7 Spherical polar coordinates……Page 191
Review exercises 4……Page 194
5.2 Set theory……Page 196
5.3 Logic……Page 204
5.4 Boolean algebra……Page 206
Review exercises 5……Page 218
6.1 Introduction……Page 221
6.2 Sequences……Page 222
6.3 Series……Page 230
6.4 The binomial theorem……Page 235
6.5 Power series……Page 239
6.6 Sequences arising from the iterative solution of non-linear equations……Page 240
Review exercises 6……Page 243
7.2 Vectors and scalars: basic concepts……Page 245
7.3 Cartesian components……Page 253
7.4 Scalar fields and vector fields……Page 261
7.5 The scalar product……Page 262
7.6 The vector product……Page 267
7.7 Vectors of n dimensions……Page 274
Review exercises 7……Page 276
8.1 Introduction……Page 278
8.2 Basic definitions……Page 279
8.3 Addition, subtraction and multiplication……Page 280
8.4 Using matrices in the translation and rotation of vectors……Page 288
8.5 Some special matrices……Page 292
8.6 The inverse of a 2 x 2 matrix……Page 295
8.7 Determinants……Page 299
8.8 The inverse of a 3 x 3 matrix……Page 302
8.9 Application to the solution of simultaneous equations……Page 304
8.10 Gaussian elimination……Page 307
8.11 Eigenvalues and eigenvectors……Page 315
8.12 Analysis of electrical networks……Page 328
8.13 Iterative techniques for the solution of simultaneous equations……Page 333
8.14 Computer solutions of matrix problems……Page 340
Review exercises 8……Page 342
9.1 Introduction……Page 345
9.2 Complex numbers……Page 346
9.3 Operations with complex numbers……Page 349
9.4 Graphical representation of complex numbers……Page 353
9.5 Polar form of a complex number……Page 354
9.6 Vectors and complex numbers……Page 357
9.7 The exponential form of a complex number……Page 358
9.8 Phasors……Page 361
9.9 De Moivre’s theorem……Page 365
9.10 Loci and regions of the complex plane……Page 372
Review exercises 9……Page 375
10.1 Introduction……Page 377
10.2 Graphical approach to differentiation……Page 378
10.3 Limits and continuity……Page 379
10.4 Rate of change at a specific point……Page 383
10.5 Rate of change at a general point……Page 385
10.6 Existence of derivatives……Page 391
10.7 Common derivatives……Page 393
10.8 Differentiation as a linear operator……Page 396
Review exercises 10……Page 406
11.2 Rules of differentiation……Page 407
11.3 Parametric, implicit and logarithmic differentiation……Page 414
11.4 Higher derivatives……Page 421
Review exercises 11……Page 425
12.2 Maximum points and minimum points……Page 427
12.3 Points of inflexion……Page 436
12.4 The Newton–Raphson method for solving equations……Page 439
12.5 Differentiation of vectors……Page 444
Review exercises 12……Page 448
13.1 Introduction……Page 449
13.2 Elementary integration……Page 450
13.3 Definite and indefinite integrals……Page 463
Review exercises 13……Page 474
14.2 Integration by parts……Page 478
14.3 Integration by substitution……Page 484
14.4 Integration using partial fractions……Page 487
Review exercises 14……Page 489
15.2 Average value of a function……Page 492
15.3 Root mean square value of a function……Page 496
Review exercises 15……Page 500
16.2 Orthogonal functions……Page 501
16.3 Improper integrals……Page 504
16.4 Integral properties of the delta function……Page 510
16.5 Integration of piecewise continuous functions……Page 512
16.6 Integration of vectors……Page 514
Review exercises 16……Page 515
17.2 Trapezium rule……Page 517
17.3 Simpson’s rule……Page 521
Review exercises 17……Page 526
18.1 Introduction……Page 528
18.2 Linearization using first-order Taylor polynomials……Page 529
18.3 Second-order Taylor polynomials……Page 534
18.4 Taylor polynomials of the nth order……Page 538
18.5 Taylor’s formula and the remainder term……Page 542
18.6 Taylor and Maclaurin series……Page 545
Review exercises 18……Page 553
19.1 Introduction……Page 555
19.2 Basic definitions……Page 556
19.3 First-order equations: simple equations and separation of variables……Page 561
19.4 First-order linear equations: use of an integrating factor……Page 568
19.5 Second-order linear equations……Page 579
19.6 Constant coefficient equations……Page 581
19.7 Series solution of differential equations……Page 605
19.8 Bessel’s equation and Bessel functions……Page 608
Review exercises 19……Page 622
20.2 Analogue simulation……Page 624
20.3 Higher order equations……Page 627
20.4 State-space models……Page 630
20.5 Numerical methods……Page 636
20.6 Euler’s method……Page 637
20.7 Improved Euler method……Page 641
20.8 Runge–Kutta method of order 4……Page 644
Review exercises 20……Page 647
21.1 Introduction……Page 648
21.2 Definition of the Laplace transform……Page 649
21.3 Laplace transforms of some common functions……Page 650
21.4 Properties of the Laplace transform……Page 652
21.5 Laplace transform of derivatives and integrals……Page 656
21.6 Inverse Laplace transforms……Page 659
21.7 Using partial fractions to find the inverse Laplace transform……Page 662
21.8 Finding the inverse Laplace transform using complex numbers……Page 664
21.9 The convolution theorem……Page 668
21.10 Solving linear constant coefficient differential equations using the Laplace transform……Page 670
21.11 Transfer functions……Page 680
21.12 Poles, zeros and the s plane……Page 689
21.13 Laplace transforms of some special functions……Page 696
Review exercises 21……Page 699
22.1 Introduction……Page 702
22.2 Basic definitions……Page 703
22.3 Rewriting difference equations……Page 707
22.4 Block diagram representation of difference equations……Page 709
22.5 Design of a discrete-time controller……Page 714
22.6 Numerical solution of difference equations……Page 716
22.7 Definition of the z transform……Page 719
22.8 Sampling a continuous signal……Page 723
22.9 The relationship between the z transform and the Laplace transform……Page 725
22.10 Properties of the z transform……Page 730
22.11 Inversion of z transforms……Page 736
22.12 The z transform and difference equations……Page 739
Review exercises 22……Page 741
23.1 Introduction……Page 743
23.2 Periodic waveforms……Page 744
23.3 Odd and even functions……Page 747
23.4 Orthogonality relations and other useful identities……Page 753
23.5 Fourier series……Page 754
23.6 Half-range series……Page 766
23.7 Parseval’s theorem……Page 769
23.8 Complex notation……Page 770
23.9 Frequency response of a linear system……Page 772
Review exercises 23……Page 776
24.1 Introduction……Page 778
24.2 The Fourier transform – definitions……Page 779
24.3 Some properties of the Fourier transform……Page 782
24.4 Spectra……Page 787
24.5 The t-ω duality principle……Page 789
24.6 Fourier transforms of some special functions……Page 791
24.7 The relationship between the Fourier transform and the Laplace transform……Page 793
24.8 Convolution and correlation……Page 795
24.9 The discrete Fourier transform……Page 804
24.10 Derivation of the d.f.t…….Page 808
24.11 Using the d.f.t. to estimate a Fourier transform……Page 811
24.12 Matrix representation of the d.f.t…….Page 813
24.13 Some properties of the d.f.t…….Page 814
24.14 The discrete cosine transform……Page 816
24.15 Discrete convolution and correlation……Page 822
Review exercises 24……Page 842
25.2 Functions of more than one variable……Page 844
25.3 Partial derivatives……Page 846
25.4 Higher order derivatives……Page 850
25.5 Partial differential equations……Page 853
25.6 Taylor polynomials and Taylor series in two variables……Page 856
25.7 Maximum and minimum points of a function of two variables……Page 862
Review exercises 25……Page 867
26.2 Partial differentiation of vectors……Page 870
26.3 The gradient of a scalar field……Page 872
26.4 The divergence of a vector field……Page 877
26.5 The curl of a vector field……Page 880
26.6 Combining the operators grad, div and curl……Page 882
26.7 Vector calculus and electromagnetism……Page 885
Review exercises 26……Page 886
27.2 Line integrals……Page 888
27.3 Evaluation of line integrals in two dimensions……Page 892
27.4 Evaluation of line integrals in three dimensions……Page 894
27.5 Conservative fields and potential functions……Page 896
27.6 Double and triple integrals……Page 901
27.7 Some simple volume and surface integrals……Page 910
27.8 The divergence theorem and Stokes’ theorem……Page 916
27.9 Maxwell’s equations in integral form……Page 920
Review exercises 27……Page 922
28.1 Introduction……Page 924
28.2 Introducing probability……Page 925
28.3 Mutually exclusive events: the addition law of probability……Page 930
28.4 Complementary events……Page 934
28.5 Concepts from communication theory……Page 936
28.6 Conditional probability: the multiplication law……Page 940
28.7 Independent events……Page 946
Review exercises 28……Page 951
29.1 Introduction……Page 954
29.2 Random variables……Page 955
29.3 Probability distributions – discrete variable……Page 956
29.4 Probability density functions – continuous variable……Page 957
29.5 Mean value……Page 959
29.6 Standard deviation……Page 962
29.7 Expected value of a random variable……Page 964
29.8 Standard deviation of a random variable……Page 967
29.9 Permutations and combinations……Page 969
29.10 The binomial distribution……Page 974
29.11 The Poisson distribution……Page 978
29.12 The uniform distribution……Page 982
29.13 The exponential distribution……Page 983
29.14 The normal distribution……Page 984
29.15 Reliability engineering……Page 991
Review exercises 29……Page 998
Appendix I Representing a continuous function and a sequence as a sum of weighted impulses……Page 1000
Appendix II The Greek alphabet……Page 1002
Appendix IV The binomial expansion of (n-N/n)n……Page 1003
A……Page 1004
C……Page 1005
D……Page 1008
E……Page 1009
F……Page 1011
H……Page 1012
I……Page 1013
L……Page 1014
M……Page 1016
P……Page 1017
R……Page 1019
S……Page 1020
T……Page 1022
V……Page 1023
X……Page 1024
Z……Page 1025

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

Recent Posts

Blogging And How You Can Get A Lot From It

Whether you’re just looking to type about a hobby you have or if you want to attempt to run a business, starting a blog might be worthy of your consideration. Before you get started, first take a few minutes to read these expert-provided tips below. Once you learn about blogging,…

5 tips for a good business blog

Follow my blog with BloglovinAre you also looking for a good structure for your business blogs? That you finally have a serious and good structure for all your texts that are online? On your website but also on social media. In this review you will find 5 tips from Susanna Florie from her…

Study tips from a budding engineer

“Why engineering?” is a question I get often. The answer for me is simple: I like to solve problems. Engineering is a popular field for many reasons. Perhaps this is because almost everything around us is created by engineers in one way or another, and there are always new, emerging and exciting technologies impacting…

How do I study mathematics and pass my exam?

Not sure how best to study math ? Are you perhaps someone who starts studying the day before the exam? Then you know yourself that your situation is not the most ideal. Unfortunately, there is no magic bullet to make you a maths crack or pass your exam in no time . It is important to know that mathematics always builds on…