Psychology (5th Australian and New Zealand Edition)

$19.99

Download Psychology (5th Australian and New Zealand Edition) written by Lorelle J. Burton, Drew Westen, Robin M. Kowalski in PDF format. This book is under the category Medicine and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 730363260/9780730363262/ 9780730371977/ 9780730369677/ 9780730372066. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

SKU: 8a50bae29780 Category: Tags: , , ,

Specifications

book-author

Lorelle J. Burton, Drew Westen, Robin M. Kowalski

publisher

Wiley Australia; 5th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1539 pages

language

English

isbn10

730363260

isbn13

9780730363262/ 9780730371977/ 9780730369677/ 9780730372066


Book Description

Psychology; 5th Edition (Australian and New Zealand) in PDF enables every introductory psychology student to master concepts through proven pedagogy and meaningful ‘tales from the front’ videos with practicing psychologists. Neuroplasticity content is integrated throughout every chapter.

Available as a full-colour textbook; this ebook enables every psychology student to master concepts and succeed in assessment; and supports lecturers with an extensive and easy-to-use teaching and learning package.

Some features of the latest 5th edition:

 

 

    • Additional local research and examples in each chapter

 

 

Adapting the textbook to the Australian and Asia–Pacific landscape involved drawing on the considerable body of research emerging from Australia and New Zealand; as well as including statistics relevant to local experience. Presenting research and literature relevant to students’ own countries considerably enhances the quality of the learning experience.

 

 

    • Enhanced cross-cultural and indigenous psychology coverage

 

 

Cross-cultural and indigenous psychology issues are covered both where relevant throughout the entire textbook; and also in a stand-alone chapter (chapter 19). Such coverage allows for maximum flexibility in teaching cross-cultural and indigenous psychology in an Introductory Psychology course.

 

 

    • A proven pedagogical framework: an integrated study package

 

 

Several key conceptual features remain from earlier editions that give Psychology: 5th Australian and New Zealand Edition its distinctive ‘signature’.

 

 

    • Balanced coverage of multiple perspectives

 

 

Earlier editions have endeavored to acquaint students not just with seminal research but with the conceptual frameworks that guide that research across subdisciplines. With this latest Fifth edition; the authors have once again tried to describe the strengths and limitations of the major perspectives; with increased emphasis on cognitive; humanistic; and evolutionary perspectives and on potential integrations across perspectives.

Biology and culture: micro to macro approach

A consistent theme of the textbook; introduced in the first chapter; is that biology and culture form the boundaries of psychology. Understanding people means attending simultaneously to biological processes; psychological experience; and cultural and historical context. The focus on biological and neural underpinnings echoes one of the major trends in contemporary psychological science; as technological developments allow progressively more sophisticated understanding of the neural substrates of psychological experience.

 

 

    • Conceptual orientation

 

 

The ebook is conceptually oriented. It attempts; within the limits of the author’s objectivity and expertise (considerable limits; no doubt); to give a fair and compelling account of the different perspectives psychologists take in understanding psychological phenomena.

 

 

    • Research focus

 

 

This etextbook is about psychological science. A student should come out of an Introductory Psychology class not only with a sense of the questions and frameworks for answering them but also with an appreciation for how to obtain psychological knowledge.

P.S All our prices are in US$

NOTE: This sale only includes the ebook Psychology; 5th edition (Australian and New Zealand) in PDF. No access codes or additional media is included with the product.

 

Additional information

book-author

Lorelle J. Burton, Drew Westen, Robin M. Kowalski

publisher

Wiley Australia; 5th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1539 pages

language

English

isbn10

730363260

isbn13

9780730363262/ 9780730371977/ 9780730369677/ 9780730372066

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Psychology……Page 3
Brief contents……Page 5
Contents……Page 6
Preface……Page 14
Features of this edition……Page 17
About the authors……Page 20
How to use this text……Page 22
1 Psychology: the study of mental processes and behaviour……Page 27
1.1 Psychology and positive psychology……Page 31
1.2 The boundaries and borders of psychology……Page 32
Philosophical roots of psychological questions……Page 34
From philosophical speculation to scientific investigation……Page 36
1.4 Perspectives in psychology……Page 38
The psychodynamic perspective……Page 39
The behaviourist perspective……Page 42
The humanistic perspective……Page 45
The cognitive perspective……Page 47
The evolutionary perspective……Page 51
Education and training to become a psychologist……Page 60
Major subdisciplines in psychology……Page 62
Professional associations for psychologists……Page 66
Careers in psychology……Page 67
Developing effective time management skills……Page 69
Becoming an active learner……Page 71
Effectively preparing for exams……Page 73
SUMMARY……Page 77
KEY TERMS……Page 78
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS……Page 80
REFERENCES……Page 81
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 85
2 Research methods in psychology……Page 87
2.1 Characteristics of scientific psychological research……Page 91
Quantitative research……Page 92
Theoretical framework……Page 93
Generalisability from a sample……Page 95
Objective measurement……Page 96
The logic of experimentation……Page 102
Steps in conducting an experiment……Page 104
Limitations of experimental research……Page 108
Case study methods……Page 110
Naturalistic observation……Page 112
Survey research……Page 113
2.4 Correlational research……Page 116
2.5 The internet and psychology research……Page 122
Challenges for psychology research……Page 123
2.6 Ethics in psychological research……Page 124
Deception in psychological research……Page 125
Ethics and animal research……Page 126
2.7 How to evaluate a study critically……Page 127
Replicability……Page 128
Critical thinking……Page 129
SUMMARY……Page 133
KEY TERMS……Page 134
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 137
REFERENCES……Page 139
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 143
2S Statistical principles in psychological research……Page 144
Measures of central tendency……Page 147
Variability……Page 148
The normal distribution……Page 149
2S.2 Testing the hypothesis: inferential statistics……Page 150
Statistical significance……Page 151
Common tests of statistical significance……Page 154
KEY TERMS……Page 158
REFERENCES……Page 159
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 160
3 Biological bases of mental life and behaviour……Page 161
3.1 Neurons: basic units of the nervous system……Page 164
Anatomy of a neuron……Page 165
Firing of a neuron……Page 167
Transmission of information between cells……Page 169
3.2 The endocrine system……Page 177
The somatic nervous system……Page 178
The autonomic nervous system……Page 179
3.4 The central nervous system……Page 181
The evolution of the central nervous system……Page 182
The spinal cord……Page 186
The brain……Page 187
The cerebral cortex……Page 195
Neuroplasticity — a revolutionary field……Page 200
Cognitive neuropsychology……Page 203
3.5 Brain, gene, behaviour……Page 208
Genetics……Page 209
Behavioural genetics……Page 210
SUMMARY……Page 213
KEY TERMS……Page 214
REVIEW QUESTIONS……Page 217
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 218
REFERENCES……Page 219
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 226
4 Sensation and perception……Page 227
4.1 Basic principles……Page 231
4.2 Sensing the environment……Page 233
Transduction……Page 234
Absolute thresholds……Page 235
Signal detection……Page 236
Difference thresholds……Page 238
Sensory adaptation……Page 240
Subliminal perception……Page 241
The nature of light……Page 242
The eye……Page 244
Neural pathways……Page 250
Perceiving in colour……Page 254
4.4 Hearing……Page 258
The nature of sound……Page 259
The ear……Page 261
Neural pathways……Page 266
Smell……Page 268
Taste……Page 272
Skin senses……Page 274
Proprioceptive senses……Page 279
4.6 Perception……Page 280
Organising sensory experience……Page 281
Interpreting sensory experience……Page 292
SUMMARY……Page 301
KEY TERMS……Page 303
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 307
REFERENCES……Page 308
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 315
5 Consciousness……Page 317
Measurement of consciousness……Page 321
Functions of consciousness……Page 322
Consciousness and attention……Page 324
The normal flow of consciousness……Page 328
Flow states and positive psychology……Page 329
The psychodynamic unconscious……Page 330
The cognitive unconscious……Page 333
5.3 Sleep and dreaming……Page 337
The nature and evolution of sleep……Page 338
Stages of sleep……Page 342
Psychological elements of sleep……Page 346
Three views of dreaming……Page 347
Meditation……Page 351
Hypnosis……Page 352
Drug-induced states of consciousness……Page 357
Disorders of consciousness……Page 365
SUMMARY……Page 367
KEY TERMS……Page 368
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 369
REFERENCES……Page 370
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 380
6 Learning……Page 381
6.1 Learning……Page 383
Pavlovs model……Page 385
Conditioned responses……Page 388
Stimulus generalisation and discrimination……Page 393
Extinction……Page 394
Factors affecting classical conditioning……Page 395
What do organisms learn in classical conditioning?……Page 398
Reinforcement……Page 401
Punishment……Page 402
Extinction……Page 405
Operant conditioning of complex behaviours……Page 407
Learning and cognition……Page 416
Social learning……Page 421
SUMMARY……Page 424
KEY TERMS……Page 426
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS……Page 428
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 429
WEBSITES……Page 430
REFERENCES……Page 431
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 437
7 Memory……Page 439
Mental representations……Page 443
Information processing: an evolving model……Page 446
7.2 Working memory……Page 451
Processing information in working memory: the central executive……Page 452
Visual and verbal storage……Page 453
The neuropsychology of working memory……Page 455
The relationship between working memory and long-term memory……Page 456
Declarative and procedural memory……Page 458
Explicit and implicit memory……Page 459
Everyday memory……Page 464
Encoding……Page 467
Mnemonic devices……Page 472
Networks of association……Page 474
Schemas……Page 477
7.5 Remembering, misremembering and forgetting……Page 480
How long is long-term memory?……Page 481
How accurate is long-term memory?……Page 482
Memory across the lifespan……Page 485
Why do people forget?……Page 486
False memories and repressed memories……Page 488
Disordered memories……Page 490
SUMMARY……Page 493
KEY TERMS……Page 495
REVIEW QUESTIONS……Page 496
WEBSITES……Page 497
REFERENCES……Page 498
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 507
8 Thought and language……Page 509
8.1 Units of thought……Page 512
Manipulating mental representations……Page 513
Concepts and categories……Page 515
Reasoning……Page 520
Problem solving……Page 524
Decision making……Page 528
Heuristics……Page 530
Bounded rationality……Page 531
Implicit cognition……Page 532
Implicit problem solving……Page 533
Connectionism……Page 536
Language and thought……Page 542
Transforming sounds and symbols into meaning……Page 547
The use of language in everyday life……Page 552
8.5 Language development……Page 555
Nature and nurture in language development……Page 556
A critical period for language development?……Page 560
What infants know about language……Page 561
From babbling to bantering……Page 563
Is language distinctly human?……Page 565
SUMMARY……Page 569
KEY TERMS……Page 570
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS……Page 572
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 573
REFERENCES……Page 574
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 582
9 Intelligence……Page 583
9.1 The nature of intelligence……Page 586
9.2 Intelligence testing……Page 587
Binets scale……Page 588
Tests of intelligence……Page 589
The extremes of intelligence……Page 595
Validity and reliability of IQ tests……Page 600
The psychometric approach……Page 605
The information-processing approach……Page 609
Current multifactor theories of intelligence……Page 611
Individual differences in IQ……Page 616
Group differences: race and intelligence……Page 621
The science and politics of intelligence……Page 623
SUMMARY……Page 625
KEY TERMS……Page 626
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 627
REFERENCES……Page 628
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 637
10 Motivation and emotion……Page 639
Psychodynamic perspective……Page 643
Behaviourist perspective……Page 646
Cognitive perspective……Page 647
Humanistic perspective……Page 652
Evolutionary perspective……Page 654
Applying the perspectives on motivation……Page 657
10.2 Eating……Page 658
Homoeostasis……Page 659
What turns hunger on?……Page 661
Obesity……Page 663
10.3 Sexual motivation……Page 667
The sexual response cycle……Page 669
Sexual orientation……Page 673
The behavioural genetics of homosexuality……Page 676
10.4 Psychosocial motives……Page 677
Achievement and other agency motives……Page 678
Theories of emotion: physiological components……Page 682
Subjective experience……Page 684
Emotional expression……Page 686
A taxonomy of emotions……Page 690
The neuropsychology of emotion……Page 695
Emotion regulation……Page 697
Perspectives on emotion……Page 699
SUMMARY……Page 709
KEY TERMS……Page 711
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 713
REFERENCES……Page 714
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 728
11 Personality……Page 730
11.1 What is personality?……Page 733
Freuds models……Page 736
Drive model……Page 739
Analytical psychology……Page 746
Object relations theories……Page 748
Assessing unconscious patterns……Page 750
Contributions and limitations of psychodynamic theories……Page 752
11.3 Cognitive–social theories……Page 753
Encoding and personal relevance……Page 755
Expectancies and competences……Page 756
Self-regulation……Page 758
Contributions and limitations of cognitive–social theories……Page 759
11.4 Trait theories……Page 761
Eysencks theory……Page 762
The five-factor model……Page 763
Six-factor HEXACO model……Page 766
Is personality consistent?……Page 768
Contributions and limitations of trait theories……Page 774
11.5 Humanistic theories……Page 776
Rogers’ person-centred approach……Page 777
Existential approaches to personality……Page 778
Contributions and limitations of humanistic theories……Page 780
Genetics and personality……Page 781
Personality and culture……Page 785
SUMMARY……Page 789
KEY TERMS……Page 790
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 794
REFERENCES……Page 795
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 806
12 Physical and cognitive development……Page 807
Nature and nurture……Page 810
The importance of early experience……Page 811
Stages or continuous change?……Page 815
Longitudinal studies……Page 816
Sequential studies……Page 817
12.3 Physical development and its psychological consequences……Page 818
Prenatal development……Page 819
Infancy……Page 822
Childhood and adolescence……Page 823
Adulthood and ageing……Page 825
Perceptual and cognitive development in infancy……Page 827
Piagets theory of cognitive development……Page 833
Information-processing approach to cognitive development……Page 844
Integrative theories of cognitive development……Page 847
The digital age and adolescent cognitive development……Page 849
Cognitive changes associated with ageing……Page 850
Ageing……Page 856
SUMMARY……Page 861
KEY TERMS……Page 862
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 864
REFERENCES……Page 865
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 878
13 Social development……Page 879
Attachment in infancy……Page 883
Bowlby’s theory of attachment……Page 884
Individual differences in attachment patterns……Page 886
Implications of attachment for later development……Page 890
13.2 Socialisation……Page 895
The role of parents……Page 896
The role of culture……Page 898
Socialisation of gender……Page 899
Socialisation and learning……Page 901
Friendships……Page 902
Sibling relationships……Page 908
The evolving self-concept……Page 909
Concepts of others……Page 911
Perspective-taking and theory of mind……Page 912
Children’s understanding of gender……Page 913
The role of cognition……Page 918
The role of emotion……Page 923
Making sense of moral development……Page 925
Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development……Page 928
Development from adolescence to old age……Page 932
SUMMARY……Page 940
KEY TERMS……Page 941
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 943
WEBSITES……Page 944
REFERENCES……Page 945
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 961
14 Health, stress and coping……Page 963
14.1 Health psychology……Page 966
History of health psychology……Page 967
Theories of health behaviour……Page 974
Health-compromising behaviours……Page 979
14.2 Barriers to health promotion……Page 1001
Individual barriers……Page 1002
Health system barriers……Page 1003
Community, cultural and ethnic barriers……Page 1006
Stress as a psychobiological process……Page 1011
Stress as a transactional process……Page 1012
Sources of stress……Page 1013
Stress and health……Page 1019
Coping mechanisms……Page 1025
Social support……Page 1026
14.5 The future of health psychology……Page 1030
SUMMARY……Page 1034
KEY TERMS……Page 1035
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 1037
REFERENCES……Page 1038
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1053
15 Psychological disorders……Page 1055
15.1 The cultural context of psychopathology……Page 1059
Is mental illness nothing but a cultural construction?……Page 1060
15.2 Mental health and mental disorders……Page 1063
15.3 Contemporary approaches to psychopathology……Page 1064
Psychodynamic perspective……Page 1065
Cognitive–behavioural perspective……Page 1067
Biological approach……Page 1069
Systems approach……Page 1070
Evolutionary perspective……Page 1072
15.4 Descriptive diagnosis: DSM and psychopathological syndromes……Page 1074
DSM controversies……Page 1078
Neurodevelopmental disorders……Page 1079
Schizophrenia……Page 1080
Bipolar and depressive disorders……Page 1086
Anxiety disorders……Page 1094
Obsessive–compulsive and related disorders……Page 1098
Trauma- and stressor-related disorders……Page 1099
Dissociative disorders……Page 1100
Somatic symptom and related disorders……Page 1101
Feeding and eating disorders……Page 1102
Conduct disorder……Page 1105
Substance-related disorders……Page 1106
Personality disorders……Page 1112
Are mental disorders really distinct?……Page 1116
SUMMARY……Page 1118
KEY TERMS……Page 1119
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 1122
WEBSITES……Page 1123
REFERENCES……Page 1124
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1140
16 Treatment of psychological disorders……Page 1142
16.1 Mental health services……Page 1146
Clinical psychologists……Page 1147
Mental health and health care utilisation……Page 1148
16.2 Psychodynamic therapies……Page 1149
Therapeutic techniques……Page 1150
Varieties of psychodynamic therapy……Page 1152
16.3 Cognitive–behavioural therapies……Page 1154
Classical conditioning techniques……Page 1155
Operant conditioning techniques……Page 1161
Mindfulness……Page 1162
Cognitive therapy……Page 1163
16.4 Humanistic, group and family therapies……Page 1166
Humanistic therapies……Page 1167
Group therapies……Page 1169
Family therapies……Page 1170
16.5 Biological treatments……Page 1173
Antipsychotic medications……Page 1175
Antidepressant and mood-stabilising medications……Page 1176
Antianxiety medications……Page 1178
Electroconvulsive therapy and psychosurgery……Page 1179
Culture and treatment……Page 1182
Pharmacotherapy……Page 1185
Psychotherapy……Page 1186
SUMMARY……Page 1193
KEY TERMS……Page 1194
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 1197
WEBSITES……Page 1198
REFERENCES……Page 1199
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1210
17 Attitudes and social cognition……Page 1211
The nature of attitudes……Page 1215
Attitudes and behaviour……Page 1219
Persuasion……Page 1221
Attitudes to the environment……Page 1225
Cognitive dissonance……Page 1227
17.2 Social cognition……Page 1232
Perceiving other people……Page 1236
Stereotypes and prejudice……Page 1239
Attribution……Page 1252
Biases in social information processing……Page 1254
Social and non-social cognition……Page 1259
17.3 The self……Page 1260
Approaches to the self……Page 1261
Self-esteem……Page 1262
Self-consistency……Page 1263
Self-presentation……Page 1264
SUMMARY……Page 1268
KEY TERMS……Page 1269
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 1271
REFERENCES……Page 1272
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1287
18 Interpersonal processes……Page 1288
18.1 Relationships……Page 1291
Factors leading to interpersonal attraction……Page 1292
Love……Page 1297
The dark side of relationships……Page 1305
Theories of altruism……Page 1307
Bystander intervention……Page 1310
Violence and culture……Page 1313
The roots of violence……Page 1314
18.4 Social influence……Page 1324
Obedience……Page 1325
Conformity……Page 1328
Group processes……Page 1331
Everyday social influence……Page 1339
Social media……Page 1340
SUMMARY……Page 1343
KEY TERMS……Page 1344
APPLICATION QUESTIONS……Page 1346
REFERENCES……Page 1347
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1360
19 Cross-cultural and indigenous psychology……Page 1361
19.1 Culture and psychology……Page 1364
Research methods in cultural and cross-cultural psychology……Page 1366
The dimensions of culture……Page 1371
Multiculturalism……Page 1376
Impact of multiculturalism……Page 1385
Australian Indigenous cultures: Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islanders……Page 1393
Indigenous people in Aotearoa/New Zealand……Page 1411
Maori identity……Page 1414
Education and culture……Page 1415
Indigenous cultures and the psychology discipline……Page 1419
Culturally competent psychologists……Page 1427
SUMMARY……Page 1436
KEY TERMS……Page 1437
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS……Page 1439
REFERENCES……Page 1440
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS……Page 1452
Chapter 2……Page 1454
Chapter 3……Page 1455
Chapter 4……Page 1456
Chapter 6……Page 1457
Chapter 9……Page 1458
Chapter 13……Page 1459
Chapter 18……Page 1460
Chapter 19……Page 1461
Name index……Page 1462
Subject index……Page 1518
EULA……Page 1539

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