The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Science of Punishment

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Download The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Science of Punishment written by Farah Focquaert, Elizabeth Shaw, Bruce N. Waller in PDF format. This book is under the category Law and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 1138580627; 0429507216; 0367553651; 0429016646/9781138580626/ 9780429507212/ 9780367553654/ 9780429016646. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Specifications

book-author

Farah Focquaert, Elizabeth Shaw, Bruce N. Waller

publisher

Routledge; 1st edition

file-type

PDF

pages

Pages

language

English

asin

B08GTVZCF2

isbn10

1138580627; 0429507216; 0367553651; 0429016646

isbn13

9781138580626/ 9780429507212/ 9780367553654/ 9780429016646


Book Description

Philosophers; criminologists; authorized students; psychiatrists; and psychologists have lengthy requested important questions on punishment: What is its motive? What theories assist us higher comprehend its nature? Are there efficient options to punishment? Is punishment simply? How can empirical information from the sciences assist us higher perceive punishment? What are the connections between punishment and our psychology; biology; and social atmosphere?  How is punishment comprehended and administered in another way in numerous societies?

The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Science of Punishment; (PDF) is the first main reference work to deal with these and different important questions intimately; offering 31 chapters from a global and interdisciplinary group of specialists in a single; complete quantity. It contains the main theoretical approaches to punishment and its options; rising analysis from psychology; biology; and social neuroscience; and vital particular points like the facet-results of punishment and solitary confinement; stigmatization and racism; the threat and protecting components for delinquent conduct; and victims’ wants and rights. The Routledge Handbook is appropriately organized into 4 sections:

  1. Theories of Punishment and Contemporary Perspectives
  2. Philosophical Perspectives on Punishment

III. Sciences; Prevention; and Punishment

  1. Alternatives to Current Punishment Practices

A quantity introduction and a whole index assist make The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Science of Punishment important studying for postgraduate college students and higher-undergraduate in disciplines like philosophy; regulation; psychology; criminology; and forensic psychiatry; and extremely related to a quantity of different disciplines akin to social sciences and political; behavioral and neurosciences; and international ethics. It can also be an ideal useful resource for anybody focused on present theories; analysis; and packages coping with the drawback of punishment.

NOTE: The product solely contains The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Science of Punishment in PDF. No access codes are included.

Additional information

book-author

Farah Focquaert, Elizabeth Shaw, Bruce N. Waller

publisher

Routledge; 1st edition

file-type

PDF

pages

Pages

language

English

asin

B08GTVZCF2

isbn10

1138580627; 0429507216; 0367553651; 0429016646

isbn13

9781138580626/ 9780429507212/ 9780367553654/ 9780429016646

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover
Half Title
Series Information
Title Page
Copyright Page
Table of contents
Contributors
Introduction
Part I Theories of Punishment and Contemporary Perspectives
1 Theories of Punishment
Introduction: What Is a Theory of Punishment?
Why Punish? An Empirical Inquiry
What Shapes the Practices of Punishment?
The Morality of Punishment: A Normative Inquiry
Safer Society – Reductivism
Punishing According to Desert – Retributivism
Solidarity with and Compassion For Victims
Concluding Remarks
References
2 Retribution
Introduction
Classic, Or Positive, Retribution
Retribution Is Not Vengeance
Desert Is a Kind of Moral Responsibility
Problems with Knowing Intentions
Problems with Desert
Making Punishment Fit the Crime
Conclusion
Notes
References
3 Offenders as Citizens
Citizens and Enemies
Civic Roles and a Common Law
Civic Punishment
Civic Punishment and its Appropriate Modes
Notes
References
4 Hybrid Theories of Punishment
Varieties of Hybrid Account
Relegating Retributivism
Necessary Characteristics of the Punished
An Unsupported Distinction
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
Notes
References
5 Limiting Retributivism and Individual Prevention
Limiting Retributivism
Types of Limiting Retributivism
Limiting Retributivism and Risk Assessment
Determining Sentencing Ranges
Principles of Preventive Justice
Proving Risk
Conclusion
References
6 The Contours of a Utilitarian Theory of Punishment in Light of Contemporary Empirical Knowledge about the Attainment …
Introduction
Deterrence
General Deterrence
Specific Deterrence
Incapacitation
Rehabilitation
Proportionality
Conclusion
Notes
References
7 The Restorative Justice Movement: Questioning the Rationale of Contemporary Criminal Justice
Introduction
Restorative Justice As a New Paradigm of Crime and Justice
The Logic of Modern Criminal Justice
Crime As a Public Wrong
Offenders Must Be Punished
The State Is Responsible for Punishing Criminal Wrongdoers
The Restorative Justice Challenge
Crime As a Violation of a Person
Abolition of The Concept of Crime
Virtual Abolition of Criminal Law and the Absorption of “Crimes” into Civil Law
Giving Victims of Crime More of a Say in How “Their” Offenders Are Punished
An Obligation To Repair Harm Rather Than To Undergo Punishment
Away From Statist Solutions: Restorative Justice and Civil Society
Conclusion
Notes
References
Part II Philosophical Perspectives on Punishment
8 Defamiliarizing Punishment
Introduction
Too Little Or Too Much?
Failure or Success?
Apollonian or Dionysian?
References
9 The Retributive Sentiments
Notes
References
10 The Right To Punish
Introduction
The Government’s Right to Punish: Criminal Law as the Extrema Ratio
Harm
Proportionality
Extrema Ratio as Political Choice
Notes
References
11 Problem of Proportional Punishment
Is Proportionality a Retributivist Idea?
In What Sense Do Crimes and Punishments “Match”?
Is the Idea of Proportional Punishment Too Vague?
Is the Idea of Proportional Punishment Manipulable and Biased?
Concluding Thoughts
Notes
References
12 The Gap
Science and Punishment
Philosophy and Punishment
Policing the Gap
Notes
References
13 Science and the Evolution of American Criminal Punishment
Introduction
The Purposes of Criminal Punishment
Just Deserts
Free Will and Criminal Responsibility
Behavioral Sciences versus Forensic Sciences
The Evolution of the Criminal Law
Conclusion
Notes
References
14 What Is Wrong with Mass Incarceration?
Introduction
Is the Intrinsic Problem of Mass Incarceration Sociological or Philosophical?
Mass Incarceration: Causes and Symptoms
Does Sociology Explain the Intrinsic Wrong of Mass Incarceration?
Is Mass Incarceration Wrong from the Point of View of Punishment Theory?
The Theories and Their Limits
The Emptiness of Punishment Theory
How To Look At Mass Incarceration, and Why (Again) Punishment Theory Fails.
Toward Mass Incarceration as an Intrinsic Wrong
Rawls on Punishment in the Just Society
Mass Incarceration as a Challenge to Justice
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
Notes
References
Part III Sciences, Prevention, and Punishment
15 Punishment, Shaming, and Violence
Punishment as a Form of Violence
Does Punishment Achieve Justice and Prevent Violence?
Do We Want to Revenge Violent Behavior or Prevent It?
What Causes Violence?
The Psychology of Shame and Guilt
Does Punishment Prevent Violence or Cause It?
How Can We Transcend the Moral Commandment to Commit Punishment and Violence?
What Alternatives Are There to Prisons and Punishment?
Does Imprisonment Prevent Violence?
The San Francisco Violence-Prevention Experiment
Conclusion
Notes
References
16 Humanizing Prison through Social Neuroscience: From the Abolition of Solitary Confinement to the Pursuit of Social …
16.1 Introduction
16.2 The Ineradicable Bond Between the Brain and the Social Environment
16.3 The Neurobiological Effects of Negative Social Environments, Social Exclusion, and Socio-Environmental Deprivation
16.4 Humanizing Prison
16.4.1 Prison Environment
16.4.2 Solitary Confinement
16.4.3 Social Rehabilitation
16.5 Conclusion
Note
References
17 Effects of Prison Crowding on Prison Misconduct and Bullying
1. Increase in Prison Populations
2. Prison Crowding
3. Prison Misconduct and Bullying Among Prisoners
4. Theories of Prison Misconduct and Bullying
5. Empirical Support for the Relationship Between Prison Crowding and Misconduct and Bullying
6. Conclusions
7. Recommendations for Future Meta-Analytic Research
Notes
References
18 Biosocial Risk Factors for Offending
Genetics
Brain Imaging
Neuropsychology
Psychophysiology
Early Health Factors
The Impact of Incarceration on Biological Risk Factors for Offending
Implications of Biosocial Research on Offending for Rehabilitation
Implications of Biosocial Research on Offending for Prevention
Conclusion
Note
References
19 Brain Abnormalities Associated with Pedophilia: Implications for Retribution and Rehabilitation
Introduction
Pedophilia: Diagnosis and Definition
Neurobiological Research on Pedophilia
Potential Effects on Perceptions of Retribution
Effects on Perceptions of Rehabilitation
Conclusion
References
20 Current Trends in Cognitive Neuroscience and Criminal Punishment
Introduction
Can an Understanding of the Defendant’s Brain Function Inform Questions of Future Dangerousness?
Neuroimaging Approaches to Questions of Dangerousness: Correlational Methods
Neuroimaging Approaches to Questions of Dangerousness: Quasi-Experimental and Retrodictive methods
Neuroimaging Approaches to Questions of Dangerousness: Prospective Prediction
Neuroimaging Approaches to Questions of Dangerousness: Brain Stimulation
How Can Sentencing Decisions Be Informed by the Punisher’s Brain Function?
How Can Sentencing Decisions Be Informed by the Punisher’s Perceptions Of Brain Function?
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
Notes
References
21 Behavioral Genetics and Sentencing
What Is Meant By Behavioral Genetics and What Is Sentencing?
What Kind of Pleas Are Under Consideration?
Making a Plea
Concerns about BGBPIMs
Ethical Support for BGBPIMs
Impediments to Behavioral Genetics-Pleas in Mitigation
The Cases
The Future
Notes
References
22 Prediction, Screening and Early Intervention: A Critical Analysis
Introduction
Prediction, Screening and Early Prevention Across Disciplines, a Digest
Children at Risk
Parents of Children at Risk
Society and Children at Risk
Conclusion
References
23 Comparison of Socio-Affective Processing Across Subtypes of Antisocial Psychopathology
Socio-Affective Processing
Psychopathy and CU/PP
Antisocial-Only
Considerations for Future Research and Conclusions
Note
References
24 Forensic Mental Health Treatment and Recidivism
Introduction
The International Context
Overall Structure of Forensic Mental Health Services in England
Secure Hospitals
Community Forensic Mental Health Teams
Prison Mental Health Services
Liaison and Diversion Services
Recidivism in Forensic Mental Health Services
Assessing Risk of Recidivism
Factors Associated with Recidivism
Treatment in Forensic Mental Health Care
Medication
Substance Misuse
Psychological Therapies
Occupational Therapy
Pooled Evidence for Interventions
Summary
References
25 Recovery of Persons Labeled “Not Criminally Responsible”: Recommendations Grounded in Lived Experiences
Theoretical Background
Not Criminally Responsible: Security and Treatment Intertwined
Recovery: a Paradigm Shift in Mental Health Care
(In)compatibility: Recovery and Persons Labeled “Not Criminally Responsible”
Exploring Recovery of Persons Labeled “Not Criminally Responsible” Grounded in Lived Experiences
Forensic Recovery as an Omnipresent Lived Experience
Practice and Policy Recommendations Based on Participants’ Lived Experiences
Addressing Individual Support Needs
Integrating Stagnation in Care Pathways
Increasing Awareness of the Social Recovery Dimension
Using a Common Language
Tackling Practical Barriers
Including Space and Time to Sustain Recovery
Adjusting Professionals’ Training Programs
Implementing Policies that Enable Continuity in Relationships
Debating Tensions
Conclusion
References
Part IV Alternatives to Current Punishment Practices
26 Punishment and Its Alternatives
America Embraces Tough on Crime
What Did Tough on Crime Cost?
What Did Tough on Crime Accomplish?
The Functions of Punishment
Why Punishment Does Not Reduce Crime and Recidivism
Where Do We Go From Here?
Prosecutorial and Judicial Decision Making
Making Recidivism Reduction a Priority
Diversion is Key
Conclusion
Note
References
27 Pre-Trial Detention and the Supplanting of Our Adversarial System: A Case for Abolition
Pre-Trial Detention: The Supplanting of our Adversarial System for Adjudicating Guilt and Imposing Punishment
Adjudication of Guilt and Imposition of Punishment: an Unacknowledged Goal of Pre-Trial Detention
A Solution to Our Current Crisis: End all Pre-Trial Detention
References
28 A Non-Punitive Alternative to Retributive Punishment
Free Will Skepticism
Further Reasons to Reject Retributivism
The Public Health-Quarantine Model
Implications
Conclusion
Notes
References
29 The Takings Doctrine and the Principle of Legality
Introduction
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Notes
References
30 How to Transform a Static Security Prison into a Dynamic Organism for Change and Growth
Introduction
Principle 1– The Prison Sentence Must Be Limited to Deprivation of Liberty. Full Stop!
Principle 2 – Prison Staff Motivation, Attitudes and Competencies
Principle 3 – Consciousness and Will, On Affiliation and Complicity
Principle 4 – Prison as a Society, cf. Principle of Normality
Principle 5 – Dialogue and Equality
Principle 6 – Relationships and Environment
Principle 7 – Development and Transfer of Responsibility
Principle 8 – Respect
Principle 9 – Focus on Here and Now
Principle 10 – Focus on What IS
Principle 11 – Prison as an Arena for Learning Democracy
Principle 12 – Security
Closing Remarks
Notes
31 Towards a Strengths-based Focus in the Criminal Justice System for Drug-using Offenders
The Complex Relationship between Drug Use and Offending
The Relationship between Recovery and Desistance
Recovery and Desistance in the Criminal Justice System
Treatment as One of the Pathways to Recovery
Looking Beyond the Risks and Focusing on Empowerment
Example of a Promising Strengths-based Approach in the Criminal Justice System for Drug-using Offenders: the Drug (Treatment)
Life After Punishment: The Hard Work of Recovery and Desistance Happens in the Community
Conclusion
Notes
References
Index

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