Chemical; Biochemical; and Engineering Thermodynamics (5th Edition)

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Download Chemical; Biochemical; and Engineering Thermodynamics (5th Edition) written by Stanley I. Sandler in PDF format. This book is under the category Chemistry and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 047050479X/9780470504796/ 9781119343783. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Specifications

book-author

Stanley I. Sandler

publisher

Wiley; 5th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1032 pages

language

English

asin

B06XX2FN1R

isbn10

047050479X

isbn13

9780470504796/ 9781119343783


Book Description

In this newly revised 5th Edition of Chemical and Engineering Thermodynamics (PDF); Sandler presents a modern; applied approach to chemical thermodynamics and provides sufficient detail to develop a solid understanding of the key principles in the field. The ebook confronts current information on safety and environmental issues and how chemical engineering principles apply in biochemical engineering; biotechnology; polymers; and solid-state-processing. This ebook is appropriate for the graduate and undergraduate level courses.

NOTE: Only includes Chemical; Biochemical; and Engineering Thermodynamics; 5e in PDF. No access codes included.

 

Additional information

book-author

Stanley I. Sandler

publisher

Wiley; 5th edition

file-type

PDF

pages

1032 pages

language

English

asin

B06XX2FN1R

isbn10

047050479X

isbn13

9780470504796/ 9781119343783

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Machine generated contents note: Instructional Objectives for Chapter 1 —
Important Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
1.1. The Central Problems of Thermodynamics —
1.2.A System of Units —
1.3. The Equilibrium State —
1.4. Pressure, Temperature, and Equilibrium —
1.5. Heat, Work, and the Conservation of Energy —
1.6. Specification of the Equilibrium State
Intensive and Extensive Variables
Equations of State —
1.7.A Summary of Important Experimental Observations —
1.8.A Comment on the Development of Thermodynamics —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 2 —
Important Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
2.1.A General Balance Equation and Conserved Quantities —
2.2. Conservation of Mass for a Pure Fluid —
2.3. The Mass Balance Equations for a Multicomponent System with a Chemical Reaction —
2.4. The Microscopic Mass Balance Equations in Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics (Optional —
only on the website for this book) —
Problems. Note continued: Instructional Objectives for Chapter 3 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
3.1. Conservation of Energy —
3.2. Several Examples of Using the Energy Balance —
3.3. The Thermodynamic Properties of Matter —
3.4. Applications of the Mass and Energy Balances —
3.5. Conservation of Momentum —
3.6. The Microscopic Energy Balance (Optional —
only on website for this book) —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 4 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
4.1. Entropy: A New Concept —
4.2. The Entropy Balance and Reversibility —
4.3. Heat, Work, Engines, and Entropy —
4.4. Entropy Changes of Matter —
4.5. Applications of the Entropy Balance —
4.6. Availability and the Maximum Useful Shaft Work that can be obtained In a Change of State —
4.7. The Microscopic Entropy Balance (Optional —
only on website for this book) —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 5 —
Notation Introduced in this Chapter —
5.1. Liquefaction. Note continued: 5.2. Power Generation and Refrigeration Cycles —
5.3. Thermodynamic Efficiencies —
5.4. The Thermodynamics of Mechanical Explosions —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 6 —
Notation Introduced in this Chapter —
6.1. Some Mathematical Preliminaries —
6.2. The Evaluation of Thermodynamic Partial Derivatives —
6.3. The Ideal Gas and Absolute Temperature Scales —
6.4. The Evaluation of Changes in the Thermodynamic Properties of Real Substances Accompanying a Change of State —
6.5. An Example Involving the Change of State of a Real Gas —
6.6. The Principle of Corresponding States —
6.7. Generalized Equations of State —
6.8. The Third Law of Thermodynamics —
6.9. Estimation Methods for Critical and Other Properties —
6.10. Sonic Velocity —
6.11. More About Thermodynamic Partial Derivatives (Optional —
only on website for this book) —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 7 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter. Note continued: 7.1. The Criteria for Equilibrium —
7.2. Stability of Thermodynamic Systems —
7.3. Phase Equilibria: Application of the Equilibrium and Stability Criteria to the Equation of State —
7.4. The Molar Gibbs Energy and Fugacity of a Pure Component —
7.5. The Calculation of Pure Fluid-Phase Equilibrium: The Computation of Vapor Pressure from an Equation of State —
7.6. Specification of the Equilibrium Thermodynamic State of a System of Several Phases: The Gibbs Phase Rule for a One-Component System —
7.7. Thermodynamic Properties of Phase Transitions —
7.8. Thermodynamic Properties of Small Systems, or Why Subcooling and Superheating Occur —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 8 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
8.1. The Thermodynamic Description of Mixtures —
8.2. The Partial Molar Gibbs Energy and the Generalized Gibbs-Duhem Equation —
8.3.A Notation for Chemical Reactions —
8.4. The Equations of Change for a Multicomponent System. Note continued: 8.5. The Heat of Reaction and a Convention for the Thermodynamic Properties of Reacting Mixtures —
8.6. The Experimental Determination of the Partial Molar Volume and Enthalpy —
8.7. Criteria for Phase Equilibrium in Multicomponent Systems —
8.8. Criteria for Chemical Equilibrium, and Combined Chemical and Phase Equilibrium —
8.9. Specification of the Equilibrium Thermodynamic State of a Multicomponent, Multiphase System
the Gibbs Phase Rule —
8.10.A Concluding Remark —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 9 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
9.1. The Ideal Gas Mixture —
9.2. The Partial Molar Gibbs Energy and Fugacity —
9.3. Ideal Mixture and Excess Mixture Properties —
9.4. Fugacity of Species in Gaseous, Liquid, and Solid Mixtures —
9.5. Several Correlative Liquid Mixture Activity Coefficient Models —
9.6. Two Predictive Activity Coefficient Models —
9.7. Fugacity of Species in Nonsimple Mixtures. Note continued: 9.8. Some Comments on Reference and Standard States —
9.9.Combined Equation-of-State and Excess Gibbs Energy Model —
9.10. Electrolyte Solutions —
9.11. Choosing the Appropriate Thermodynamic Model —
Appendix A9.1 A Statistical Mechanical Interpretation of the Entropy of Mixing in an Ideal Mixture (Optional —
only on the website for this book) —
Appendix A9.2 Multicomponent Excess Gibbs Energy (Activity Coefficient) Models —
Appendix A9.3 The Activity Coefficient of a Solvent in an Electrolyte Solution —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 10 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
10.0. Introduction to Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium —
10.1. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in Ideal Mixtures —
Problems for Section 10.1 —
10.2. Low-Pressure Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in Nonideal Mixtures —
Problems for Section 10.2 —
10.3. High-Pressure Vapor-Liquid Equilibria Using Equations of State (0-0 Method) —
Problems for Section 10.3. Note continued: Instructional Objectives for Chapter 11 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
11.1. The Solubility of a Gas in a Liquid —
Problems for Section 11.1 —
11.2. Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium —
Problems for Section 11.2 —
11.3. Vapor-Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium —
Problems for Section 11.3 —
11.4. The Partitioning of a Solute Among Two Coexisting Liquid Phases
The Distribution Coefficient —
Problems for Section 11.4 —
11.5. Osmotic Equilibrium and Osmotic Pressure —
Problems for Section 11.5 —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 12 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
12.1. The Solubility of a Solid in a Liquid, Gas, or Supercritical Fluid —
Problems for Section 12.1 —
12.2. Partitioning of a Solid Solute Between Two Liquid Phases —
Problems for Section 12.2 —
12.3. Freezing-Point Depression of a Solvent Due to the Presence of a Solute
the Freezing Point of Liquid Mixtures —
Problems for Section 12.3 —
12.4. Phase Behavior of Solid Mixtures. Note continued: Problems for Section 12.4 —
12.5. The Phase Behavior Modeling of Chemicals in the Environment —
Problems for Section 12.5 —
12.6. Process Design and Product Design —
Problems for Section 12.6 —
12.7. Concluding Remarks on Phase Equilibria —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 13 —
Important Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
13.1. Chemical Equilibrium in a Single-Phase System —
13.2. Heterogeneous Chemical Reactions —
13.3. Chemical Equilibrium When Several Reactions Occur in a Single Phase —
13.4.Combined Chemical and Phase Equilibrium —
13.5. Ionization and the Acidity of Solutions —
13.6. Ionization of Biochemicals —
13.7. Partitioning of Amino Acids and Proteins Between Two Liquids —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 14 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
14.1. The Balance Equations for a Tank-Type Chemical Reactor —
14.2. The Balance Equations for a Tubular Reactor. Note continued: 14.3. Overall Reactor Balance Equations and the Adiabatic Reaction Temperature —
14.4. Thermodynamics of Chemical Explosions —
14.5. Maximum Useful Work and Availability in Chemically Reacting Systems —
14.6. Introduction to Electrochemical Processes —
14.7. Fuel Cells and Batteries —
Problems —
Instructional Objectives for Chapter 15 —
Notation Introduced in This Chapter —
15.1. Solubilities of Weak Acids, Weak Bases, and Amino Acids as a Function of pH —
15.2. The Solubility of Amino Acids and Proteins as a function of Ionic Strength and Temperature —
15.3. Binding of a Ligand to a Substrate —
15.4. Some Other Examples of Biochemical Reactions —
15.5. The Denaturation of Proteins —
15.6. Coupled Biochemical Reactions: The ATP-ADP Energy Storage and Delivery Mechanism —
15.7. Thermodynamic Analysis of Fermenters and Other Bioreactors —
15.8. Gibbs-Donnan Equilibrium and Membrane Potentials —
15.9. Protein Concentration in an Ultracentrifuge. Note continued: Problems —
Appendix A.I Conversion Factors For Si Units —
Appendix A. II The Molar Heat Capacities Of Gases In The Ideal Gas (Zero Pressure) State —
Appendix A. III The Thermodynamic Properties Of Water And Steam —
Appendix A. IV Enthalpies And Free Energies Of Formation —
Appendix A.V Heats Of Combustion —
Appendix B.I Windows-Based Visual Basic Programs —
Appendix B. II Dos-Based Basic Programs —
Appendix B. III Mathcad Worksheets —
Appendix B. IV Matlab Programs.

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